Girl Scouts at Home
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Girl Scout Home Edition

Girl Scouts can learn from anywhere! Join the Girl Scout community through virtual learning opportunities - and even earn badges! Below is a list of virtual events, badges, and resources to help you through this time.

These are certainly trying times, but that’s also why this is the perfect time for Girl Scouts to shine their brightest. Girl Scouts have always been known for their willingness to try and for facing new, even sometimes overwhelming, challenges with optimism and creativity. Essentially, the world needs Girl Scouts right now more than ever. That’s why we’re proud to offer a new way for families to embrace the experiences, learning, and joy of Girl Scouts wherever they may be.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made it impossible for Girl Scouts to meet in person in their traditional groups or troops, so we’ve reimagined our program for girls to do it on their own—with their family or solo—using items you likely already have at your fingertips. 

Below you'll find more information on how girls, their families and troop leaders can continue to participate in Girl Scouting at home or virtually until we are able to meet again in person.

Online Safety Pledge

Instilling in girls an understanding of the best ways to stay safe in today’s complicated world is a top priority for us. If your Girl Scout activities involve use of the Internet, be sure to consult this Online Safety Checklist. Then have all participants sign the Girl Scout Online Safety Pledge.

Wondering how to talk to your kids about coronavirus?  Read this Raising Awesome Girls article from GSUSA for tips.

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Face Mask Patch

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Help those on the COVID-19  front lines!
We know Girl Scouts want to help during this crisis. We have put together a how-to video for facemasks that are in great need. Before you start this project - contact your local hospital, doctor’s office or health provider to let them know you want to donate homemade facemasks. Ask if they have any specific requirements and coordinate a date, time  and location to drop them off – adults should drop off masks to be donated. Be sure to follow the guidelines of COVID-19 safety. 

Click here for a quick video lesson on how to make face masks? Click here for written instructions.

Patches are $2 each. Click here to order patches. All patchs are orders are due July 1, 2020.

Please let GSCI know if you are doing this project. Please email kday@girlscouts-gsci.org the following information:

  • Your contact information (name, address, city, state, zip, phone, email)
  • How many masks you are donating
  • Who they are being donated to
Also, please check with your local JOANN Fabrics – they will donate supplies for this project – let them know you are from Girl Scouts!
 
Take pictures to share with us so we can thank everyone on social media.
 
 
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Keep Girl Scouts Going

All across the county, we're navigating through uncharted waters. And though things may look and feel very different right now, what hasn't changed is that Girl Scouts is still the place where your girl can find comfort, community, and optimism that will help her power through these difficult times. 

We hope this guide, Keep Girl Scouts Going, can help you support your girl and family.

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Virtual Badges

Looking for more patches to work on? Check out our patch programs!  You can work on monthly patches (feel free to start working on next month's too), camp patch program, and on-going patch programs like Free Being Me and uniquelyME (which are both free in the Trefoil Boutique when they reopen).

Follow us on Facebook to see virtual events, programs, how-tos. We have a complete schedule for you to join us. See below Virtual Online Events

GSCI Virtual Programs and Events (Facebook)

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Join us each week during our "shelter in place" for fun programs & more all from the comfort of your home! All will be featured on our  Facebook page. We will conduct Facebook Live events on a variety of interesting subjects. Click here to view current schedule.

Sparkle & Shine Supplies

Coding for Good - June 1 at 3:00 p.m.

Please use this as needed so girls are prepared for the activity:

Graph paper

Kick Cabin Fever with the American Heart Association

Girl Scouts of Central Illinois is offering “Kick Cabin Fever to the Curb!  We are so excited to participate in this learning program from the American Heart Association that will teach your student how to care for their hearts—physically and emotionally!  

  1. Sign up on the Girl Scouts of Central Illinois page of Kids Heart Challenge at http://www2.heart.org/goto/gsci
  2. On the Girl Scouts of Central Illinois Kids Heart Challenge page, Pick one of these challenges to do during the 10 days of “Kick Cabin Fever to the Curb".
  3. Every day for 10 days, pick one of the physical activities listed below and open the links listed below and do the physical challenge!! 

Home Activities

Recipes
Since it is hard to get to the store for ingredients, try to make just one of these healthy recipe choices during the entire 10 days.

Tips for Parents

This activity can help your scout contribute to the health of our community and could serve as a welcome distraction to maximize the quarantine time by keeping kids active and having fun, and earning badges. Thank you from the American Heart Association!!

Week 1 - March 17 - March 21

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Outdoor Art Maker

Daisy Outdoor Art Maker - See the Colors of Nature

March 17, 2020
Go outside and find something representing each color in the rainbow. Don't forget to look high and low! Write down what you found using crayons and markers in each color. If you have a printer at home, print the Campsite Coloring Page to create an outdoor masterpiece. Or, if you're feeling super creative, use paint, markers, crayons, or colored pencils to create your own outdoor picture! 

March 18, 2020
Hear the Sounds of Nature
Go outside or listen out of your window to hear the sounds that surround you.  Listen carefully and write down the sounds you can hear. Can you hear the following sounds?

  • Insect buzzing or humming
  • Birds chirping
  • Cars driving by
  • Dog barking
  • Frog croaking
  • Leaves rustling
  • Wind Blowing
  • Squirrel or chipmunk chattering

What else can you hear!?  

March 19, 2020
Share your Outdoor Art
A Girl Scout always leaves a place better than she found it!  Use your artistic skills to tell a story and share with your family and friends how you can help take care of the outdoors by "leaving no trace".  Perform a skit OR draw a picture of yourself helping the environment by following the seven important steps below:

  1. Know before you go
  2. Choose the right path
  3. Trash your trash
  4. Leave what you found
  5. Be careful with fire
  6. Respect wildlife
  7. Be Kind to other visitors

For more detailed steps click here.

Purchase Daisy Outdoor Art Maker

Daisy Petals

Daisy Petals

March 17, 2020
Daisy Petal - Lupe
Read " Lupe's Story," which teaches about honesty and fairness. Make sure to talk about the importance of listening to our friends, taking turns and how sharing feels good! 

Also, note the rhyming words: share, care, fair and see if your Daisy can think of additional words that rhyme! Lastly, discuss Lupe's decision to think twice about eating some cheese alone. 

Isn't everything more fun when shared with our friends?!

Act out the story
Print and decorate craft stick puppets, then attach to a craft stick, straw or piece of cardboard.  Use the puppets to act out Lupe's Story. Use silly voices and have fun with it! 

You can also bring in other props from around the house, such as string for the jump rope, a small box with buttons for the cheese, etc.

Show how to share
By using a small snack, such as, goldfish, grapes or m&m's, help your Daisy divide them up into even groups for each member of the household!  Start by using namecards, placemats or separate bowls to indicate how many people she will need to provide for. Then, help her count out an even number for each person. Lastly, enjoy the snack together!

Lupe Maze
Story about being truthful

March 18, 2020
Daisy Petal - Sunny
Read " Sunny's Story ," which teaches how to be friendly and helpful. Pick out the specific ways the characters demonstrate friendship. Then, make the story relatable by discussing a time your Daisy was a true friend.  Note how Suzy was looking down, not talking and feeling shy, while missing her family. While empathy may be too advanced for your Daisy, you can still teach through example and give them the proper language to use. Daisy's can likely identify multiple emotions and interpret body language in order to understand other's feelings.

Lastly, brainstorm another way she can be helpful like Sunny.

How to Help Your Five-Year Old Develop Empathy

Sunflower Craft
Gather the following supplies to make a fun sunflower craft: Toilet paper or paper towel tube, white paper, scissors, glue, yellow paint (link below to make it) and material for "sunflower seeds".

The "seeds" could be raisins, seeds, black pom poms, cheerios or simply draw the seeds! Cut slits into the tube, then dip into paint to make sunflower prints. Then, use glue to stick your seeds in the center. Feel free to get creative and add stems, leaves, or an entire Daisy Flower Garden!

Sunflower Craft
Salt and Flour Paint

Helping Hand Flower Bouquet
Now it's time to put thought into action!  Your Daisy has learned what being friendly and helpful means.  More importantly, she understands that it feels great to help others!  Help her create a flower bouquet with ideas on how to help out at home during this time of school and work closures. 

For this project, your Daisy can trace her hand on various colors of paper then cut them out. Help her think of helpful things to do for the household, such as, sweep up crumbs, put away toys, plan a family game or put away clean laundry. She could also call and check on a neighbor or relative or choose a meal to have delivered to someone in need. Write these ideas on each hand and attach to a craft stick or other firm object to make a "flower."

Lastly, find an unused flower pot, vase or cup to place her flowers in! Choose each activity at your leisure and enjoy being friendly and helpful together!

March 19, 2020
Daisy Petal - Zinni
Read and discuss " Zinni's Story". Read and/or  watch Zinni's Story. Remind your Daisy that The Girl Scout Law includes being considerate and caring. Discuss how Zinni forgot those promises then noticed how her behavior affected those around her (the goldfinch). She recognized her mistake and quickly shared the paint, which caused others to share as well. Girl Scouts are wonderful examples of how to be considerate and caring!

Consider and Compliment Others
Zinni learned how to take others into consideration, even when she was super excited about going to the art room. Help your Daisy practice noticing and considering others throughout the day.  Click here to see her examples to use, such as, 'You did a great job!' and 'I like how you did that!' Have her color in the conversation bubbles, as she practices using them with family members at home.

Practice Being Considerate and Caring
Show your Daisy how to set the table for a family meal! Everyone gets a similar place setting and is offered a share of each food prepared. She can even help prepare the meal and/or clean up afterwards! Caring for our familiy means helping out and ensuring they receive healthy food. Your Daisy is sure to love helping out in the kitchen!  Click here for an example of a place setting to copy.

March 20, 2020
Daisy Petal - Tula
Read and/or  watch and discuss "Tula's Story-Standing Up for Darla". Tula displays courage and strength in this story, where she encounters her classmates making fun of another friend. Discuss how Tula felt scared to say something but then realized she could find an adult to help her. It's important to help others in need, even if it's difficult. Has your Daisy seen this happen before at school or at a playdate? Encourage her to share how she felt and what happened. Try to role play another scenario and give her specific words to use when girls are teasing each other. Tula said, "I see that Darla is sad. How about if everyone plays together?" Also, the story ends beautifully with forgiveness. This is an important lesson, as well, because we all make mistakes!

Learn about Ruby Ridges
Ruby Bridges was a courageous and strong First Grader! She was the first black child in an all-white elementary school in 1960. The grown-ups were angry that she was there and told their children not to play with her. How do you think Ruby felt? How would you handle this situation?  Watch "The Story of Ruby Bridges" and discuss how brave Ruby was.

Assemble a Color Book
Print and assemble this  book for your Daisy to color! Encourage her to read the book to you or another family member and explain why Ruby Bridges is similar to Tula. Ask your Daisy if she knows anyone that displays courage and strength. There are many examples of strong women to research with her!

Purchase Daisy Petals

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Outdoor Art Creator

Brownie Outdoor Art Creator - Find Art Ideas Outdoors

March 17, 2020
Look for art inspiration outdoors.  Go for a walk in your backyard and see how many of these items you can find that can help inspire the artist inside. If you are not able to go outdoors take a peek through some of your windows.

  • A leaf
  • A bird
  • A squirrel
  • A rock with a cool color or shape
  • Colored moss growing on a rock or tree
  • A pinecone or acorn
  • A plant that is budding (leaf is starting to grow)
  • A bird nest
  • Cloud with a cool shape
  • Puddle (check out what you see in the reflections)
  • Sound of a bird singing
  • Sound of the wind blowing through trees or tall grass

March 18, 2020
Make Something!
Think back or revisit one of the items that you found outside in step one and draw a picture of that item. To add a little fun take a piece of paper and fold in in half. On one side draw your item using the colors you see. On the other half randomly pick 3 colors without looking and use those to draw the item. It’s best to use colored pencils or coloring crayons for this activity. When completed have an adult snap a picture of your artwork and share to help brighten other peoples day! They can text it to friends, email, or post on social media. We would love to see what you have done on our Facebook page! Just add it in the comments of one of our Sparkle & Shine posts.

March 19, 2020
Dance or Make Music Outdoors
I like to move it, move it!  The great outdoors can inspire us to “Move It” in unique ways. Think about animals you may see outdoors or on your favorite nature show.  How do they move? Do they move differently from us? 

Let’s put on a show highlighting some of our favorite animal dance moves.  Print and cut out the attached cards (or write on paper if you are unable to print). Place them in a bowl and have your family take turns drawing an animal, acting out the animal moves, and guessing which animal they are. 

Need a little wild inspiration?  Check out these sweet moves. 

Animal Dance Moves

March 20, 2020
Be a Nature Photographer
A nature photographer is an artist who takes pictures outdoors. They might photograph animals, plants, sunsets, or waterfalls. If you were a nature photographer what 5 things would you photograph?

Using a camera or smart phone go outside and take photos of the following things:

  • A nature landscape scene
  • A plant close up
  • An animal or a sign of an animal (nest, track, etc.)
  • Interesting cloud or a sunrise/sunset
  • Something in nature that isn’t natural (manmade)

March 21, 2020
Design with Nature

Animals and insects are designers and architects: Birds make nests, spiders spin webs, and beavers build dams. They create there to live in, or to catch food, or for protection.

Let pretend that we are all birds and we need to build a nest to live in.  Chose one of these methods to build a nest:

I'm Feeling Crafty!

  • Gather some nest building materials you may have at home such as: yarn, string, paper, straws, and sticks.
  • Gather tools: scissors and glue
  • Using the nesting materials try to build your own nest. Cut up materials and weave them together or add a little glue to help them stick. To make things a little more challenging only use your thumb and pointer finger (a beak) to build your nest.

I'm Feeling Hungry!

  • Gather some edible nest building supplies such as: pretzel sticks, crackers, veggie straws, or sliced veggies
  • Gather mud: something that will help the nest stick together such as peanut butter, almond spread, or frosting
  • Build an edible nest on a plate using the supplies. Pretzels are a great substitute for swigs and grass. To make things more challenging build your nest like the birds do…with your mouth!

Purchase Brownie Outdoor Art Creator

Brownie My Family Story

Brownie My Family Story

March 17, 2020
There are all kinds of family stories and all kinds of families. As you explore these stories think about the below questions.

We will be using the Monthly Patch Women in leadership for this activity. Choose one woman that you would like to research. Compare their family to your family by answering the following questions: How are the families the same? How are they different? Are the families like your own? 

March 18, 2020
Know where your family is from
Find out which different countries, States, or Towns your family comes from. Family Stories are passed down differently in different cultures. How does your family share its family traditions and history?

Ask your family about a festival, holiday or event they love. Learn why that day is special. How do people have fun on that day? Try out one highlight of the day with your family. It could be a ritual, costume or recipe. Create a collage of pictures you find either of your family participating in the event  or magazine pictures.

March 19, 2020
Make a Story Tree
Knowing who your family members are is only half the fun! Find a special detail about each person to write on your family tree.

Create your own family tree:
Option #1- Go outside and grab limbs from your back yard to create your own tree. See link for instructions.
Option #2- fill in a family tree sheet. You can use different colors and shapes or use pictures of your family, too.

March 20, 2020
Family Time Capsule
Find an object that means something to your family. Objects like photos, jewelry and books can mean a lot. They can be favorite things from old times, or things that make people feel special. This means that objects can have their own stories!

Make a family time capsule. Create a time capsule to share with your family. Include pictures of important objects, photos, family news and even your drawings. Decide together when it will be opened!

March 21, 2020
Share a Family Story
Share your family story. You've heard so many amazing family stories. Now its time to share them with others!

Option #1: Have a member of the family that lives out of town? Become a pen pal and write about what you and your family are doing. Includes pictures if you can.

Option #2: Make a Family Crest. In some countries, each family has a crest. A crest is a picture that uses colors and symbols to show what is important to the family. Think of what's important to your family, then draw your own crest.

Purchase Brownie My Family Story

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Outdoor Art Explorer

Junior Outdoor Art Explorer - Explore Outdoor Art

March 17, 2020
First, get ready to go outside! This can be your yard, in your neighborhood, or at a nearby park--just make sure you're going somewhere without a lot of other people. Talk to an adult about where you want to go and review these safety tips with them:

  • Don’t go alone. Make sure an adult you know joins you on your outdoor adventure.
  • Dress the part. Sunny out? Don’t forget the sunscreen! Cold out? Zip up! Wear protective clothing—like a jacket, a hat, and gloves. Hiking a trail? Wear hiking shoes.
  • Pack for safety. Bring a backpack with a reusable bottle of water. Optional: a first aid kit with bandages and antibiotic cream, a whistle, a flashlight with batteries, and a camera.
  • Stay connected. Bring a cell phone in case you need to contact someone for help. If you don’t have a phone, make sure an adult with you does—and that the phone has good reception.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Pay attention to where you walk. Keep an eye out for signs, especially if you’re hiking a trail that goes in different directions.

Now it’s time to get outside and observe the local wildlife in your area. Be sure not to get too close! To get the most natural idea of what an animal is like, you want them to not know you’re there, so keep your distance and keep quiet!

Think about the different colors, textures, and body parts that you see. How do these features help each living creature thrive in your environment? Now mix things up! Create an art piece—it could be a painting, a sculpture, or a collage, or whatever else you have around to work with—to show a whole new kind of wildlife that would be well suited to your local environment. Maybe a bullfrog with a wide tail to fan itself during heat waves, or a pigeon that grows a fur coat when it’s cold? The sky’s the limit! 

March 18, 2020
Make Something!
Using clay or salt dough, make an outdoor-themed impression. You might collect leaves or shells, or anything that’s unique to the area where you live. Press your found objects into the clay or dough, then remove them and return them to the place where they were found. If you’d like to hang your impression when it’s finished, make a hole at the top for string. (You may need to re-poke the hole a few times as your impression dries to keep it from closing up.) Your impression can be dried in the oven on low heat—ask an adult for help—or outside in the sun on a hot day.

Don’t have any clay? Here’s a recipe for homemade dough made out of just flour, salt and water! You can also add food coloring to this recipe to make it extra fun. 

Here’s a video showing how to make your impressions or prints with clay.

March 19, 2020
Find Music in Nature
Rainy days are common in Illinois in March and April. Next time there’s a rainy day, go outside or open a window (make sure it doesn’t rain in!) and really listen to the sounds of the rain. How do the sounds change as the rain gets heavier and lighter throughout the day? If it’s a thunderstorm, how does it sound different as the storm gets closer and farther away?

Then try to re-create the sounds of a rainstorm with music. You can do this on your own or try using zoom or another video calling site to set up a video call with your fellow Girl Scouts where you can sing together or do the rainstorm activity (instructions below) Record your music and share with other Girl Scouts by posting on facebook and tagging @Girl Scouts of Central Illinois!

Pick one girl to be the leader. The leader starts making sounds, and one by one each person follows their lead. You should figure out what order you’ll go in as a group. If you’re the leader, you might start like this:

  • Rub your palms together
  • Snap your fingers
  • Clap two fingers on the palm of your hand
  • Clap your hands
  • Slap your lap or slap the floor
  • After the sounds get very loud, repeat the activities in reverse as the “storm” dies down.
  • Then slowly stop, until it is silent.

Not a cloud in sight? Here’s a recording of rain that asks you questions about what you hear! 

March 20, 2020
Be a Nature Photographer
Photographers are artists who see the world through the lens of a camera. Head outside with a camera (a cell phone camera works, too--if you don’t have a cell phone, see if you can borrow one) and become a nature photographer!

First, look up some outdoor photographers and check-in via facetime, zoom, or another virtual service with your troop to talk about the photos. Which ones do you like? What do you notice about them? How do they make you feel?

As you look at the photos, pay special attention to the way light looks in the picture. Where are there shadows? Where is it very bright? How big are the shadows? Is the light the same everywhere in the picture?

Now, go outside with your camera, and take some pictures. Pick one subject that you would like to photograph multiple times. Go out once in the morning, once in the middle of the day, and once at night to photograph the same thing. How different do they look? Which one do you like the best?

Upload your pictures to facebook and tag @Girl Scouts of Central Illinois so we can see all your awesome art!

Get started with these awesome femail nature photographers:

March 21, 2020
Design with Nature
From sculptures to gardens, outdoor art changes the appearance of the environment. Work together with nature to design a piece of outdoor art.

First, look at some examples of outdoor art and talk about it with your troop using facetime, zoom, or another online communication service. Or you can talk about it with your family. There may be some that you can visit at a park or public space that you can safely visit, or you can search online. There are a couple links below to get you started. How does the art change the look of the area around it? Is it something you would have chosen for that space? What do you like about it? Does it remind you of anything?

 Then, design your own piece of outdoor art. It can be anything from a statue, to a mural, to a garden! Sketch or paint a picture of the kind of outdoor art you’d like to see in your community. Want some extra fun? Use the salt dough recipe from Tuesday’s activity to make a model of your outdoor art, or use random objects around the house or found outside to make a model. Be sure to return anything you found outside to where you found it!

Outdoor Modern Art
Public Art

Purchase Junior Outdoor Art Explorer

Junior Scribe

Junior Scribe -  Start with a Poem

March 17, 2020
Poetry can be a very powerful way to share ideas. It can make you laugh, cry or think. Two popular types of poems are Haikus and Limericks. Try your hand at writing one of each! A Haiku is a Japanese style of poem that is often about nature and that is written

  • Line 1-5 syllables
  • Line 2-7 syllables
  • Line 3-5 syllables                                                                                 

A syllable is a part of a word. It is breaking the word down into smaller sections around the vowels. You can find the syllables by clapping along while you say a word or saying the word as robotic as possible.  A limerick is often a funny poem and has a specific rhyming pattern.  It has five lines and a rhyme scheme of a,a,b,b,a (lines 1, 2 and 5 rhyme and lines 3 and 4 rhyme). They are thought to have started in Ireland, making them perfect for St. Patrick's Day!

Poems use different structures like the Haiku or Limerick with different structures, rhymes and rhythms to share different moods, emotions and stories. Do you like a certain kind of poem more than the other? What is your favorite poem? If others in your troop are also working on this badge, you can share your poems you wrote to create your own poetry book that you can all enjoy!

March 18, 2020
Write a short story!
We tell stories every day. You might tell your friends about what happened over the weekend or your parents about something funny your pet did. This is storytelling. Today we are going to write a short story using a helpful tool called a story map. Your story can be either fiction, something you’ve made up yourself, or nonfiction, something real that’s happened.

 Stories can be broken into three main parts: a beginning, middle, and end. The beginning is where you are going to tell your reader who the characters are going to be in your story and where it is going to take place. The middle is going to be the largest part of your story because that is where the problem is. Every story needs some sort of problem or conflict to keep it moving. It might be a goal your character has, like a knight’s quest, or a problem they are facing that they have to come up with a solution. The middle is also the section where we see the characters try and solve the problem. Be creative. Think of your favorite stories, whether they are books or movies and what problems those characters face. Finally, the end is the part of the story is where you is the solution to the problem and tie up any lose ends.

The link with this step will take you to a story map that will help you brainstorm your story and help you write it. You can come up with characters, setting, and the problem they will face. This will help you outline your story and give you a place to start. From there you can write your story, and don’t forget to title your work! Once you have finished, share your stories with others, you can email it to other or record yourself reading it out loud!

March 19, 2020
Use words to share who you are!
An autobiography is a book that someone writes about their own life. Have you ever read an autobiography before? Who was it by? See if you have any autobiographies in your home. What are some things you notice about the covers of these books?

Authors use titles and images to create interesting covers that give hints as to what the story is about and entices readers to pick up the book. Today you are going to think about what the cover of your autobiography would look like. What would you choose for the title and what sort of images would you use tell readers what the book is about?

Now we are going to grab a piece of paper and fold it hamburger style to look like a cover of a book and create your own autobiography book cover. If you want to look at some more covers for inspiration or if you don't have any at home, you can look them up online with the help of an adult. Some popular autobiographies are                                                                       

  • The Diary of a Young Girl, by Anne Frank
  • Boy: Tales of Childhood, by Roald Dahl
  • 26 Fairmont Avenue, by Tomie DePaola
  • A Girl from Yamhill, by Beverly Cleary
  • On the Way Home: the Diary of a Trip from South Dakota to Missouri, by Laura Ingalls Wilder"

March 20, 2020
Make a Newspaper
Being a part doesn't mean you can't work together to write a newspaper! With this step there is a link to a google doc template, that with the adult help you can use to create a newspaper with your troop or other Girl Scout friends.

You can open this link, choose use template in the right hand corner and then once you are in the template share it with friends so you can all work on the newspaper together. There is even the option to chat on the side, so you can discuss what you want to cover in your newspaper.

First, think of what different things are found in a newspaper. What are the different sections that you would find? Of course there is the news, but you’ll also find the weather, movie reviews, sports, fun stories about animals, articles spotlighting someone cool from your community, and many others. Journalists cover a wide range of topics and now are your chance to be one. When writing, you will want to make sure you are including all of the facts. A tool to help you make sure you got everything is think of the 5 Ws: Who, What, Where, When, Why

If you can answer all of those, your article is good to go! You can add pictures to your newspaper and come up with a name for it. Don’t forget to a catchy headline to get people’s attention and we’re excited to see your name in the byline! 

March 21, 2020
Tell the World What You Think!
It does not matter how old you are, everyone has an opinion on any given topic! Write a paragraph about a topic of your choice. Then share with family and friends.

Purchase Junior Scribe

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Outdoor Art Apprentice

Cadette Outdoor Art Apprentice -  Explore Art Outdoors

March 17, 2020
Art can be found everywhere, not just inside the four walls of a museum. Put on your artist’s cap and head outside to gather ideas that will spark your creativity.

You will need a camera, paper, writing utensil, and coloring utensils.

Record how things change outdoors.  Head outside and find a scene—it might be a pod , a tree, a trail, animal nest or a plant in your backyard. Write about it, take a picture everyday of it, or sketch it in color. Record everything you observe. What season is it? What time of day? What colors do you see? What do you like about your scene?  Then go out and record this same setting again at another time of day, or even a different season. You might see the same tree reflected in a pond during the summer and in ice during the winter. Is the lighting different? Did weather make a difference in the scene? In what ways do your two impressions of the same scene differ?  Compare your photos from day 1 to day 14.  What has changed?  Record your image for at least 5 days.

You can also research Nancy Holt and check out these then and now pictures from the National Parks.  

March 18, 2020
Making something! It’s always fun to make something you can wear or give away! Just make sure not to disturb growing things—only use fallen leaves, pine cones, plants, or flowers. Ready to get started?

Items to dye (sock, pillow, shirts) different food items (veggies, fruits, tea), salt, vinegar, rubber gloves, water, stove

Dye something you can wear. Find natural dye materials—beets, berries, roots, nuts, carrots, tea leaves, or flowers—to dye a shirt, pillow case, socks, tote, scarf, or whatever you want! Look for natural dyeing materials in your backyard and experiment. Use a color fixative to help your dye set (see Prepare Your Fabric for Dyeing on this page for instructions). The best fabrics to dye are cotton, silk, wool, and linen. Synthetic fabrics, like polyester, might work, too, but with lighter results.  Share what you created.  What ingredients did you use?  Did it turn out how you expected it?  What would you do different?  How did the colors come out compared to chemical dyes?  What type of fabrics did you dye?

Prepare Your fruit for Dyeing:  Blueberries, blackberries, and red cabbage create lovely blues. Raspberries and beets create red shades. Orange and lemon peels make light yellow or ochre dye. Spinach creates a nice green, and onion skins simmer into orange.

To make sure the dye sets into your fabric, first soak your fabric for at least one hour in one of these combinations:

For berry dyes: Dissolve 1/2 cup salt in 8 cups cold water

For plant dyes: Mix 4 parts cold water to 1 cup white vinegar

Make sure to use rubber gloves!

Fun Fact: To Dye-For Jeans: Denim blue jeans were originally made using dye from the indigo bush in India. Today’s jeans are dyed using a synthetic (human-made) version.

Information on natural fabric dyes

March 19, 2020
Get to know—and create—sounds of nature
The sounds you hear outdoors are a powerful connection to nature. Think about how you feel when you hear rolling thunder, water flowing in a stream, or a bird chirping. Take your cues outdoors as you absorb the natural sounds of wind, water, wildlife, weather, plants, and trees, and make music!

House hold items, different music (YouTube, records, Spotify), recorder or a phone to record sounds.

Optional Craft: Materials for Homemade Rain stick

  • Sturdy cardboard tube (tube from an aluminum foil roll, paper towel roll, or wrapping paper roll.)
  • Paint (If you don’t have paint you can use markers colored pencils, or design tape)
  • Large, brown paper grocery bag
  • Yarn
  • Rubber bands
  • Scissors
  • Pipe cleaners and/or craft wire
  • Beads, rice, beans, or other material for inside the rain stick"

Directions:

  1. Start by painting your cardboard tube. You can paint it resemble a piece of hollow wood, paint a nature scene, or draw bugs. Let it dry.
  2. Cut out two circles from a large, paper grocery bag.
  3. Attach one circle to the end of your cardboard tube using a rubber band.
  4. Experiment with different ways to fill your rain sticks.
  5. Placing a few twisted pipe cleaners into the rain stick along with rice. It sounded most like a typical sound you’d expect from a rain stick. In a separate rain stick we tried twisted craft wire with dried beans.
  6. Once you’re happy with the sound of your rain stick, rubber band the other paper circle to the opposite end.
  7. Tie some different colored pieces to yarn to each end and create music and explore sound with your homemade rain sticks!

Produce outdoor sounds. Go outdoors and listen for sounds. It can be at a park, on a trail, or in your backyard. Then go indoors to re-create the sounds vocally or by using objects to mimic the sound. For example: Blow a whistle to sound like a cricket. Drop dried beans to sound like hail. If you can, record your nature sounds. Play or perform at least 5 of your sounds for a friend to see if she can guess what it is.

Rock out to Nature: What types of music make you think of the outdoors? What types of music do you like to listen to when outdoors? Does the type of music you like to listen to change based on the activity you are doing (ex: camping versus going for a run)? Rock out to nature music while doing homework.

March 20, 2020
Be a Nature Photographer
Nature photographers take pictures not only because their subjects are beautiful but also to remind people to appreciate and respect the environment. When you portray nature through a different perspective, it opens up a new way of thinking. Explore nature and create your art through the lens of a camera. You will need a camera, printer and posterboard for this step.

Photograph patterns and textures in nature. Find ones that appeal to you, such as the swirls on a butterfly wing, the shape of a petal, the veins on a leaf, the pattern of a snowflake, or the spines of a cactus. Be creative! Head outside with your camera and find at least 5 things to photograph. Get up-close shots that my look different than if you took the picture from far away. Examples include the bark of a tree or the veins on a leaf.

Create a showcase of your work. It could be a digital album you can share, or make prints of your photos to put in a collage. Have friends and family guess what your photo is. When looking at the pictures, expand your discussion with the following questions:

  • What types of patterns or textures do you see?
  • Did the composition of the photograph make it easier or harder to guess what the subject was?
  • What was your favorite photo that you took and why? What was a favorite photo that someone else took and why?

Tips from nature photographers:

  • Keep it sharp: Be sure you’re in a stable position. Hold the camera steady with two hands, bring your elbows to the sides of your chest, and gently squeeze.
  • Capture a scene: Move until your subject is off center in your viewfinder to make the photo more interesting.
  • Turn on your flash: On a cloudy day, it can fill in shadows and brighten your subject.
  • Get down to nature’s level: For flowers and insects, shoot low to get the detail.
  • Be alert: To find small critters to photograph, listen for soft sounds, and look carefully behind rocks and under logs.
    Respect nature: Don’t trample flowers, disturb nests, or bother insects.
  • Take lots of photos: Experiment with different angles and have fun!

March 21, 2020
Design with Nature
From sculptures to gardens, outdoor art changes the appearance of the environment. Work together with nature to design a piece of outdoor art.  

Bees create honeycomb—one of nature’s most modern-looking and functional designs—by depositing wax into hexagon shapes to help store their honey. Nature’s shapes and patterns have inspired architects for centuries, like the ancient Greeks and Romans who built columns fashioned after trees. Explore ideas for design by taking a close-up look at nature. Material you will need: paper, writing utensil, coloring utensils, internet, optional: garden and landscaping books.

Design and growa square-foot garden. Design a garden to plant a bunch of different types of herbs, plants or vegetables in one square-foot area! One way is to plant seeds in a raised planter box or plastic bin divided into 12-inch squares rather than straight into the soil. Then design your grid for what to plant in each square: herbs in one section and vegetables in the other? Or plant by color—red on one side, green on the other? Landscaping blends artistic composition and horticulture. (You can use some of your garden items to dye something you can wear again.)

  • If you could use plants, trees, and flowers from any part of the world in a landscape design, what types would you choose? 
  • Why do you think it is important to have a background in both horticulture and art/design as a landscape designer or architect? 

Purchase Cadette Outdoor Art Apprentice

Cadette Screenwriter

Cadette Screenwriter

March 16, 2020
What Makes a Good Movie

  1. Pick three short films to watch on YouTube, Netflix, Disney +, or other source with your family. Disney/Pixar shorts are a good option! 
  2. While watching, take notes of things you notice during the film. Specifically: dialogue, pauses, characters, plot, scenery changes, and music.
  3. Compare notes with your family to see what everyone else noticed.
  4. As a group, decide what elements make up a good script. Use these criteria when you write your own script. This step can also be completed with your troop by communicating via phone, email, social media, Facetime, ect. Decide on 3 shorts that everyone watches and then compare notes together.

Needs some help picking out some shorts? Here are a few of our family favorites:

March 17, 2020
Come Up with an Idea for a Story
Most tales have a beginning that introduces the situation, a middle that builds on the story until it reaches a climax, and an ending that shows how everything turns out. Before you can write any of these pieces, you need a basic idea to build your script around.

Choose a fairy tale, book, nursery rhyme, or movie and tell how the character got there or what happened later. What happened after the dish ran away with the spoon? What made Grumpy so grumpy to begin with? Did Moana lead the voyaging and what did they find?

March 18, 2020
Get to Know Your Characters
Whatever your story idea, you’ll need a protagonist and an antagonist. A protagonist is the main character, good or bad. Their story moves the action along. The Antagonist is the person or situation who gets in the way of the protagonist’s dreams or schemes.

Get to know them by writing a one-page description of each. Take three aspects of people you know and combine them to round out your character. Your protagonist could have your best friend’s sense of humor, your neighbors obsession with a well-manicured yard, your brothers snort when he laughs, or maybe your dog’s ability to hear a cheese wrapper from a mile away. Be creative and add some of your life experience to your story.

March 19, 2020
Build the Plot
You have a story idea and characters. Now you need a plot! A plot is an outline of the situations your protagonist will face. Their circumstances generally grow direr as the story unfolds towards the climax, where they face their most difficult challenge.

A great writer knows that sometimes you need to prep before starting to write. Use the Plot Sheet to start planning your script. Be sure to take breaks and bounce ideas off of others. Have a sibling take a look or connect with a fellow Girl Scout and see what she thinks. Maybe their new perspective will help move your plot along.

Five Parts of a Plot

March 20, 2020
Write a 12 page script and share it
It’s time to put everything together! Screenplays include not only dialogue, but also descriptions of action that clarify how the scene is intended to look on-screen. Using your plot chart, start writing!

Write for 30-45 minutes straight. Write whatever comes to your mind; give yourself permission for it not to be perfect! Share your work with a friend or a fellow Girl Scout if you are able. Get some feedback on what you have written. Remind them that good feedback isn’t just pointing out flaws- it’s providing suggestions for improvements. Once you get some feedback go back and make edits as needed and complete your 12-page screenplay.

We would love to see your finished screenplay! If you would like to share with the council or if you would like someone to help give you feedback, please email a copy to state@girlscouts-gsci.org.

Here are a few screenplays that can provide a little inspiration:

Watch these videos to see some examples of Script to Screen by Disney/Pixar

Purchase Cadette Screenwriter Badge

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Outdoor Art Expert

Senior Outdoor Art Expert

March 18, 2020
Creative inspiration can spring from the things you experience, so head outside to take in the sights and sounds of the great outdoors.

First, read the interview with artist Kelli Nelson, who creates works inspired by nature in Minneapolis or watch this broadcast from New York City on the Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit.  Pay special attention to where she finds her inspiration, what materials she uses, and why she likes to incorporate nature into her art.

Next, look over the outdoor art pieces here and choose one or two of your favorites.  Do your best to recreate the piece of art at home or sketch it on paper.

March 18, 2020
When you use nature as inspiration to create something, it’s not just aesthetically pleasing but also sends a positive message. What you make allows others to appreciate—and explore—their relationship to nature.

Go out into your own backyard or take a walk around your neighborhood and complete one of the two following projects:

While on your walk, keep your eye out for litter - from candy wrappers and soda cans to discarded tires and plastic toys—and then create something. (Safety note: Always wear gloves when collecting items, and avoid anything sharp, like needles, or toxic, like paint cans.) You can plaster your findings into a sculpture, or glue them to canvas with pictures, drawings, and writing for a multimedia project. Name your art piece and include a brief description for what you want to say about preserving the environment, then post it on social media for others to see.

Alternatively, you can pick up items from nature – pinecones that have fallen off trees, rocks of various shapes and sizes, discarded leaves, sticks that are in interesting shapes… and turn these pieces of nature into a work of art.  

March 19, 2020
Throughout history, nature has played an important role in music—it influences the sounds and lyrics that artists create. Some artists also use music to communicate their desire to protect nature. Let the sounds of nature be your tool to compile—or make—your own music.

Use natural objects to make your own instruments at home – use this video for inspiration. 

Or, take your cell phone outside and record natural sounds (birds singing, wind rustling through trees, insects buzzing), and human-made ones  (a car honking, a jet flying overhead, an off-road vehicle, a person yelling, or the engine of a lawnmower or snowmobile) together. Then share with friends and family to see if they can detect the human-made sounds and the natural sounds.

March 20, 2020
When nature photographers take pictures of plants, wildlife, and landscapes, it might mean sitting for hours to snap a blue jay taking flight or being on high alert during a storm in order to capture the instant lightning strikes. Nature photographers may experience daring adventure and exotic travel, but it starts with technical skills and an eye to shoot nature’s subjects. Try out a different technique for taking pictures outdoors.

Choose one of the following two projects to explore nature photography:

  • Create a time-lapse project of a scene outdoors. Take pictures of an object outdoors in a single frame at a time over a period of time—a day, week, or month. It might be clouds in the sky or plants and flowers growing. Then load the images on a computer or use an app to make a time-lapse video. Or print out three of your images and put them together side-by-side to create a triptych.
  • Or, if you have a smartphone camera, experiment by using different filters offered, such as noir, process, chrome,  or black and white. Play around with different modes like flash or high dynamic range (HDR). Or find an app that can help you shoot panoramic, make your photos look vintage, or assemble them into a collage. How does it change the look and feel of what you shot?

March 21, 2020
In step 3, you learned how environmental art helps educate people about the natural world. Now think of this same idea on a grander scale.

Architects and engineers often take cues from nature for their designs. For example, one of the world’s largest buildings in Taiwan is shaped like tall bamboo. A stadium in China looks like a bird’s nest. An Iranian architect designed a temple that resembles a lotus flower. In Dubai, a group of human-made islands form the shape of a palm tree.  In this final step, you’ll get to make a “big mark” on the world to show your creativity. 

Murals are human-made images on walls or other flat surfaces. Take a walk outside to get inspired, then sketch a design or go on your computer to create a mural that focuses on something in nature. It could be the night sky, a forest, or a message about the environment. If you can, sketch your mural image on a chalkboard, whiteboard, plywood, or a large canvas to see how it would look. You could even use chalk on the sidewalk of your house to make this mural! 

Purchase Senior Outdoor Art Expert

Senior Novelist

Senior Novelist

March 17, 2020
Experience the fun of a novelist's career and learn the steps involved in writing a novel. Then, write your own work of fiction.

Definition of novel - (noun) an invented prose narrative that is usually long and complex and deals especially with human experience through a usually connected sequence of events

Deconstruct a novel - deconstructing an already published novel or a great work of fiction is a good tool to help you develop your own novel

Look for a novel around your home.  If you cannot find one in your home, look on the internet.   Your local library may have an online option for checking out material.  A good source for a variety of young adult novels can be found here. As with anything you get from the internet, a responsible adult should review your choice of novel to make sure it is appropriate. 

Begin reading your novel and deconstructing it. Who are the characters and how are they connected? Is there a protagonist? What is the hook? Start a writer's journal to collect your thoughts and ideas as you move along the process toward completing you own novel.  Use these tips on working through the story.  

March 18, 2020
Create great characters
Characters are the heart of a great novel. If you already have an idea of a plot, keep that in mind as you develop your characters.  Many authors develop their characters and let the story ideas bloom.

There are several ways you can develop characters for your novel. One, use people you know and exaggerate some qualities to make them more fascinating. 

Two, use characters from your favorite novel to develop personalities.  Three, use character profiles to create a hero and a villain and use their conflict to drive their characteristics. Click here for a good source for character development. 

March 19, 2020
Develop a Plot
The plot is a story’s sequence of events.  The plot draws the readers into the lives of characters and moves the story along. 

Explore character-driven plots and action-driven plots and decide which method you will use for your novel. Perhaps, you will use a blend of both.  You can outline your plot with using a “Hero's Journey” or a “W Plot”.

See more on these methods:
Plotting
Novel Deconstruction

March 20, 2020
Write at least 20 pages
By now, you will have several notes in your writer’s journal that you can use for ideas and inspiration as you begin to write. Decide whose voice (point of view) will be telling the story – is it in first or third person? Remember, you can write drafts as you may need to edit and add to your plot as the story evolves before your eyes.

Start writing your novel knowing that the first lines in your book will hook the reader for tips on writing first pages click here.

March 21, 2020
Edit your pages
Editing can mean the difference between a midcore novel and a truly great one. 

Polish your work by using a critical eye. First, you should edit your work; then, ask a friend or family to critique your work and provide feedback. For tips on “point of view” use:

Purchase Senior Novelist

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador College Knowledge

Ambassador College Knowledge -   Explore your options

March 17, 2020
Explore your options by looking online at www.bigfuture.org, where you can search for schools all over the country, find detailed information about each one, and build lists to help you compare schools. Choose at least three schools that interest you and meet your family’s needs, and compare them in this step. Be sure to consider size of school/class size, your interests/hobbies and if you plan to continue pursuing them in college, and your intended field of study-does the college you are interested in offer that program?

March 18, 2020
Start the admissions process
Colleges and universities want to see more than just a list of grades and activities—they’re interested in who you are as a person. Admission essays and interviews give you the chance to show your best self: you can share what makes you stand out from the crowd, why you’d be a good fit for a particular school, and how your personal experiences (like Girl Scouts!!) have made you who you are today.

Sharpen your storytelling skills by taking part in a mock interview with a friend or family member—you can find sample questions online; OR write a first draft of an application essay and share it with a teacher, guidance counselor or another adult. You can even send it into Kourtney Pygott at GSCI at kpygott@girlscouts-gsci.org to look over by March 31, 2020.

Mock Admissions Activity
Interview Questions to Expect
College Essay

March 19, 2020
Make a Financial Plan
The cost of a college education can look overwhelming at first—but there are many options available for financial assistance, including scholarships.

Are you highly ranked in your class? Are you an athlete? Are you the daughter of a veteran? Can you make a prom dress out of duct tape? (Seriously—look it up!)

There are special scholarship opportunities available just for Girl Scouts, too. Visit the Girl Scout site for scholarships available just for you. 

Live in Illinois? Check out the state of Illinois for scholarship opportunities.

Be sure to check out unusual scholarships; they are really fun and you may have a hidden talent that helps pay for your education.

Also, check out the ultimate guide to financial aid. It's important to know what will need to be paid back and what won't.

Once you’ve researched your options, apply for at least one scholarship!  

March 20, 2020
Get Set for Success
Prevent procrastination. When you put off assignments or studying, it almost always adds to your stress level and reduces the quality of the final product.

Research techniques for fighting procrastination online. Try a few different techniques until you find what works best for you. Talk about your findings with a family member, teacher, or guidance counselor, and get their input. How do they address procrastination in their own lives?

Be sure to watch Tim Urban's Ted Talk and decide what the top three key points or concepts from Tim's talk were.

March 21, 2020
Build Healthy Habits
When you start college, you’ll take your first step into an independent adult life. You’ll be juggling classes, homework, friends, family, finances, and extracurricular activities. It can be challenging to balance it all and still find time to breathe— but you’ve got this!

Let's talk about managing stress. Academic pressure may feel more intense when it’s layered on top of a poor diet, lack of sleep, or homesickness. Pay attention to your stress level over the course of several weeks, and take notes about it.

When do you feel the most stressed? Do you notice a difference when you’re tired or hungry, or when you’ve been looking at a screen for a long time? Does exercise make a difference? Caffeine? Do your hormones seem to factor in? Try at least three different healthy ways to prevent stress before you feel it, or push back against it when you do.Think about times when you think you may feel stressed or anxious at college—maybe finals, writing papers, meeting your new roommate for the first time—and how you will manage it in a healthy way.

Check out some of the links provided and come up with your own college stress management plan- actually write it down and think through the techniques that will work best for you.

Purchase Ambassador College Knowledge

Ambassador Outdoor Art Master

Ambassador Outdoor Art Master -  Explore Outdoor Art

March 17, 2020
Find a comfortable spot in your home that has a window. Sketch what you see outside the window and take time to reflect what you’re observing. Ask a family member to look out the same window ask them what they see? Show them your sketch and explain your observation in detail.

March 18, 2020
Make Something - Rock Garden
You will need to go outside and collect a variety of rocks preferably with a flat surface. Bring the rocks inside and clean any dirt off the rocks. Once the rocks are dry you can paint them solid colors. Add creative faces to make a variety of fruits and vegetables. 

How to Make Garden Markers

March 19, 2020
Finding Music in Nature
Make a nature walk play list. Think of relaxing, motivational, soothing music that will allow your mind to explore while taking this walk. Once you compile your list make a map that you will navigate!

March 20, 2020
Be a Nature Photographer
Use the rocks that you painted from step 2 as models for your photography project. Find locations outside to place the rocks. For example: you can stick a rock painted like a carrot in the ground and take a picture of you picking the rock out of the ground. Take a few pictures and build a portfolio and you can share your pictures on social media with the title Gardening Rocks! 

March 21, 2020
Design with Nature
Think of a park in your community that could use a makeover. Brainstorm ideas that can make this park more interesting, safe and enjoyable for all families. Come up with a sketch of your idea. If available share your ideas with your local park district. 

Purchase Ambassador Outdoor Art Master

Week 2 - March 23 - March 27

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Petals

Daisy Petal

March 23, 2020
Daisy Petal - Mari
Read and/or watch "Mari's Story-Keeping a Cupcake Promise".  Can your Daisy keep a promise? This story shows how Mari stayed true to her word, finishing the cupcakes for her school bake sale. She even had to sacrifice getting ice cream with her cousins! Was that hard for Mari to do? Help your Daisy think of a time she had to finish something she started, even if it meant foregoing something else.

Make a Door Hanger Chore Chart
Being responsible is a critical part of growing up! Daisy's can show that they are responsible for what they say and do by completing helpful chores! Print the template and use colorful paper or cardstock to create a door hanger. Next, gather some clothespins and have your Daisy come up with some age-appropriate chores. Write them on the clothespin and decorate, if you wish! The left side of the door hanger is labeled "to do" and the right side says "done". Each day, clip on the clothespins with the chores for that day (clean room, set table, sort laundry, take care of the dog, etc.). Then when your Daisy does that particular chore, they move the clothespin from the "to do" side to the "done" side! So fun!

Girl Scout Law
Congratulations! You have earned 5 petals: Lupe, Sunny, Zinni, Tula and Mari! Let's say The Girl Scout Law up to Mari's line. Now you know five lines of the Law! Keep up the great work!

March 24, 2020
Daisy Petal - Gerri
Read and/or watch Gerri's Story-Playing by the Rules. It is a story about respecting authority. Doing so helps keep us safe.

Take a Drive
This is a perfect time to take a drive! Just like the Flower Friends, take a drive, follow safety rules and find the following places and signs: Buckle your seatbelt, stop at a stop sign, find fire station, find a school, yield at a crosswalk and look for a police car. What other places of authority or street signs can you find? Make a list with your Daisy and set out!

Say Thank You
After discussing authority, rules and the reason behind them, take a moment to show your gratitude towards those who keep us safe. Choose a fire station, physician or any other essential worker to make a thank you card for. Let them know how much we appreciate their sacrifice and how we are helping by staying home, donating resources, etc.

March 25, 2020
Daisy Petal - Rosie
Read and/or watch Rosie's Story-A Better Beach for Everyone. In this story, Rosie discovers a problem; there is too much trash at the beach! She asks the beach patrol officers for help and they come up with a solution together. Encourage your Daisy to speak up when she sees a problem and help her find a solution. Children have wonderful ideas and love to see them come to life!

Clean Up the Yard
Get some fresh air and be helpful at the same time! Grab a garbage bag and help pick up trash, sticks and weeds from your yard. Also, think about helping a neighbor by cleaning up their yard, as well. Stay safe and use gloves, if necessary. Now your yard is ready for Spring! What else can you do around the yard?

Make a Bird Feeder
Let's help make the world a better place! Rosie helped by spreading the word about how to have less trash to throw away. She made a chart explaining how you can use reusable lunch boxes vs. paper sacks, resusable water bottles vs. juice boxes and plastic/glass containers vs. plastic bags.

Help your Daisy understand this concept by making a bird feeder from items around the house! Some examples include using a bagel, plastic bottle or toilet paper roll to cover in cream cheese or peanut butter then rolling in bird seed. If you do not have bird seed, you may also use cheerios, strung on pipe cleaners!

Be creative with what you have and use see the homemade bird feeders help spark your imagination! Enjoy watching birds eat from their new feeder in your clean and tidy yard!

March 26, 2020
Daisy Petal - Vi
Read and/or watch Vi's Story-Friends Around the World. Friends Around the World teaches Daisies that Girl Scouts are part of a world wide sisterhood. Girls around the world may do things a bit differently, but we all feel the same emotions, enjoy playing with our friends and love being a Girl Scout. Ask your Daisy to think of differences and similarities amongst her friends. Does she know anyone from another country?

Learn the "Make New Friends" Song
Listen to "Make New Friends!" Then, practice with your Daisy a few times, pointing out the rhyming words. You may even want to get out any instruments you may have at home and entertain the rest of the family! Have fun learning a new song with your Daisy!

Find a New Pal
Did you know pen pals still exist?! Click here to on How to Find a Modern Day Pen Pal. Help her find a virtual pen pal, discuss being a Girl Scout, how she is earning her petals and what she has been doing the past couple weeks. It's a great time to connect with new friends, even if it is virtually!

March 27, 2020
Amazing Daisy - Promise Center
Watch a story about promises.  Click here to watch "Pinkalicious: Pinkie Promise" and discuss the definition of a promise and why it's important to keep our promises.

Dani Daisy Maze
Print, color and complete the Dani the Daisy Maze! In addition, print and help your Daisy color the corresponding petals she has completed thus far! Tell her she's doing great!

Learn and Recite
Teach your Daisy the Girl Scout symbol and recite the Girl Scout Promise together. Ask and discuss the following questions: What if we forget our promise? What are some promises you have made to others that you have honored? What do the words, “I will try” mean? What are some ways we can serve God? How can we serve our country? What people can we help?

Purchase Daisy Petals

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Pets

Brownie Pets

March 23, 2020
Find Out What Care Different Pets Need
Pets are as different as the people who love them. Play Pet Bingo to find out which pet would be the best fit for you! For some extra fun, divide up the animals with the other girls in your troop, then meet using Zoom or another virtual platform to share what you've learned. Complete the whole bingo sheet as a team!

March 24, 2020
Keep a Pet Comfy
Pets need a clean and comfortably place to live--if their cage, tank, or doghouse is dirty, they can get sick. Learn what one pet needs to have a home sweet home!

First, find out what makes a good sleeping space for a specific kind of pet, Horses, cats, and snakes all like very different things! Then, make a real or miniature bed for a pet of your choice. Need some inspiration? Try making a no-sew pet bed!

March 25, 2020
Help a Pet Stay Healthy and Safe
You take a bath, brush your hair, brush your teet, and put on clean clothes regularly for good hygiene. Pets also need to be washed, brushed, or taken care of in another way. PIck three pets and find out how often they have to be washed or brushed and any other special care tips. If you have a pet, be sure to pick the kind of animal you have for one of your three, and then practice grooming it! Here's a worksheet to help gather your info about pet care.

March 26, 2020
Make a Pet Feel Loved
Pets need attention, hugs, and kind words, as well as lots of time to have fun and play. Learning to be a good pet owner is like elarning to be a good parent! One thing you have to learn is how to understand what your pet is trying to tell you. They can't speak with humans, but they do communicate their feelings!

For example, a happy cat often purrs, and a dog that wants a walk might scratch at the door. Find out about hosw three different kinds of pets communicate about their feelings.

Click on the links below to videos about how dogs, cats, rabbits, and horses communicate, or you can find out about another animal! Share what you've learned by playing animal charades. You can do this with your troop with Zoom or with your family!

March 27, 2020
Feed a Pet
One of the most important responsibilities of a pet owner is knowing what her pet eats, how much it needs to eat, and waht it can't eat. And, of course, making sure there's food ready when the pet gets hungry. Use the Pet Care Chart to find out all the information about feeding a pet, plus any other extras that you'll need to know! If you have a pet at home, try taking charge of feeding your pet based on the schedule you make.

Purchase Brownie Pets Badge

Brownie Painting

Brownie Painting

March 23, 2020
Get Inspired
Learn more about the paintings you like and the artists who painted them by visiting a museum. While visiting pick five paintings that you love and decide why you think they’re great. Who painted them? When? Look for what they have in common now.

Since most museums and art exhibits are closed you can go on a virtual tour!

March 24, 2020
Paint the Real World
Painting what’s around you is the first step to becoming an artist. Let’s paint a still life! A still life is an object like a bowl of fruit, a baseball and glove, a vase of flowers, or maybe your favorite book and reading glasses. Set up your still life display and paint it. Be sure to show how light hits the object by using light and dark colors. 

Here are some videos that will help you develop your painting techniques:

Here are some videos that will help you develop your painting techniques:

March 25, 2020
Paint a Mood
Some painters create “abstract” art. They don’t paint objects or people. They use shapes, lines, and colors to paint a feeling or mood. What colors would you use to represent different moods/feelings?

  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Anger
  • Joy
  • Sorrow
  • Calm
  • Love
  • Jealousy
  • Bold
  • Optimism 

Now choose 2-3 different emotions/feelings and create an abstract painting.

March 26, 2020
Paint without Brushes
Who says you have to paint with brushes? Let’s try to paint using the pointillism technique. Pointillism is a technique of painting in which small, distinct dots of color are applied in patterns to form an image. Georges Seurat is a famous artist that used this method. Learn more about Seurat and his works.

Pointillism Painting
Materials Needed: paint, plate to put pant on, cotton tips, white paper or a page from a coloring book

Instructions:

  • On your white paper sketch out what you want to paint. If you don’t want to sketch an image you can instead remove a page from a coloring book.
  • Add your colors needed to a paper plate.
  • Place your cotton tip into a color and start dotting your picture. Be sure you are just making dots and not brushing on the paint. 
  • Don’t be afraid to add different shades of colors to your picture to give it more depth.
  • Share your finished painting with friends and family.

View examples of pointlissism

March 27, 2020
Paint a Mural
A mural is a really big painting that tells a story. Murals are sometimes painted on buildings.

Do you have any murals in your town? If so, ask an adult to take a drive to see the murals from the safety of your car. If you are not able to visit the mural have and adult help you search for a picture of it online.

Here are a few examples of murals that can found in different cities:

Now that you have some inspiration paint your own mural that tells a story. You can create your mural or butcher paper, taping smaller pieces of paper together, back side of wrapping paper, cardboard box broken down.

If you had sidewalk chalk paint you can paint your sidewalk! Here are a few recipes you can use to make your own sidewalk chalk paint:

Purchas e Brownie Painting Badge

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Animal Habitats

Junior Animal Habitats

March 23, 2020
Find out about wild animals
Observe a pet (it can be a dog, cat, fish) for at least 15minutes. Watch closely how they behave. Write at least 3 things about how the pet behaviors. Pretend you’re a Girl Scout in 1980. As girls did to earn their Hobbies and Pets badge, find out why these six animals would not make good pets: wolf, deer, raccoon, monkey, baby alligator, skunk.

Materials Needed: internet, writing itensil, paper, adult to help you navigate the internet, and your pet!

Watch a show about an animal related to the one you observed. If you watched a dog you might observe a wolves. Which behaviors do the wild and tame animals share? Which are different? Check out the links for live cams at zoos!

  • Things to think about while observing. In what country is the animal naturally found?
  • How does its fur or skin help the animal live in this habitat?
  • How does it stay clean?
  • How does it get around in this habitat?
  • What kind of food can it find in this habitat?

San Diego Zoo Live
National Zoo Live

March 24, 2020
Investigate an animal habitat
One habitat can contain lots of different animals-you might think of it as a city in the wild kingdom.

Materials Needed: magazines, computer and printer, scissors, and a friend

Make a habitat collage. Scientists use habitats to group animals by things they all share. Cut out 15 – 20 pictures of wild animals from old magazines or print them from the internet. Group the animals by habitat. Then group them by how they look, how they move, or how they bear their young. Did your groups change? Discuss with a friend - and make up ways to groups animals.

Classification: scientists use a system called "biological classification "to put living things into groups. There are seven ranks, or levels, in this system, The levels start with a large number of creatures and then get smaller. The levels are: kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species.

More to Explore: Taming wild animals. Taming a wild animal takes a lot of skills and can be dangerous-never try it on your own! If you're interested in the process, find someone who can tell you more. What about a horse trainer at a stable. You can learn more during one of Girl Scouts of Central Illinois Horse Summer Camps!

March 25, 2020
Create an animal house
You’ve watched how animals use their habitats and thought about why they live in that area – now take a look at the houses they build in their habitats. Each habitat has unique challenges for animal builders!

Materials Needed: Package of Jell-O, small container with a lid, a sorted items from outside, random household items, and a spoon

Insulate your own “nest.” Many animals use insulation to keep their homes cool in hot temperatures or warm in the cold. They may line a nest with feathers or burrow into snow or mud to hold in body heat. Try this experiment:

1. Mix a package of Jell-O. Before it sets, put part of the liquid into a small container with a lid or sealed top, like a baby food jar or resealable plastic bag. Pour the rest into a mixing bowl.

2. Insulate the small container the way an animal might insulate its nest. You could bury the container in leaves and sticks in the yard or use materials in your house, like socks, to burrow it.

3. Keep the container in its warm, insulated place while the mixing bowl with the rest of the Jell-O stays out in the air – in the same area as your “nest” container.

4. When the bowl of Jell-O has set (gotten firm), uncover and check your “nest.” If it’s still liquid, you’ll know your insulation would have kept the animals inside warm. If it set, try building your animal home again!

5. Share what happened with your Junior friends, and talk about the “warmest” nest designs. What made them work well? What materials didn’t work as well?

Did you know:

  • Emperor penguins hold their penguin chicks under a special flap called the “brood flap.” This keeps the chicks warm and safe. Also, the penguin’s feet keep the chick from touching the cold ground.
  • A koala mother carries her baby in her pouch for about 6 months, until it is large enough to ride on the mother’s back or belly. The baby koala rides on the mother’s back or belly until it is about a year old.
  • Orangutan mothers build new nests for her and her baby almost every day. The nests are 15 to 100 feet up high in a tree. Sometimes, they make a mid-day nest to nap in. Also, every once in a while, they reuse old nests and just add new branches.

Watch a Weaver Bird build a nest in a single day

What Are Nests Made Of?

March 26, 2020
Explore endangered habitats
When the animals no longer have their habitat, they have to adapt to a new place to live. Some animals can’t change, and end up becoming endangered. Answer these questions about one of the endangered animal habitats. The Artic Circle, The Gold of Mexico, or The Amazon Rain Forest.

  • Why is it in danger?
  • What is happening to the animals?
  • What are people doing to help the habitat?
  • Are the animals able to adapt?

Endangered Animals: An endangered animal is at rick of becoming extinct, or dying out, because there are so few left. Sometimes this happens naturally, but most of the time a species is pushed to extinction because of human activities. When the government list an animal as endangered, it becomes illegal to harm it. In 1967, the bald eagle was an endangered species. People worked her to protect the bird and it worked! Today the bald eagle's population is stable. It was removed from the list of endanger and threatened wildlife in 1997. Click here to find out what animals are on the endangered list.

Pretend you’re a Girl Scout in 1963. As girls did to earn their Conservation badge, list the birds and fur-bearing animals that are protected by laws in your state.

March 27, 2020
Help protect animal habitats
You can take steps to help protect animals’ homes and prevent them from becoming endangered.

Materials Needed: Slice of sandwich bread for each hanger, cookie cutter or paring knife, Yarn or other strong piece of string or cord, peanut butter or vegetable shortening, wild bird seed

Create a background habitat. Get permission from your family to make a habitat in your yard. Research and then carry out a landscape plan that is best for wildlife in the area. Record the wildlife you attract and their behavior. (The Audubon Society has some good resources to get you started.) Right now is a good time to start your garden indoors and transplant it in the spring. Research ways to help wildlife in your backyard. Keep fresh water outside, create a butterfly garden, plant hummingbird friendly garden, put up a bat house, or hand birdfeeders. Everyone needs to eat! Planting native shrubs and trees is the easiest way to provide the foliage, nectar, pollen, berries, seeds and nuts that many species of wildlife require to survive and thrive.

Instructions for bird feeders:

1. Use a cookie cutter to create shapes from slices of sandwich bread. We did stars and circles for our treats.

2. Let bread sit on the counter until dried out, a couple of hours should do the trick.

3. Line a plate with bird seed.

4. Use a toothpick or wooden skewer to poke a hole through the bread for the string. Be sure that you leave enough room above the hole so that it doesn't tear.

5. Thread string through the hole and gently tie in a knot.

6. Spread both sides of bread shape with peanut butter. Coat with bird seed by laying it on the bird seed lined plate and turning over to coat thoroughly.

7. Hang your creation outside.

More to Explore: Re-create an oil spill. Oil spills have affected both the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic Circle. Find out how hard they can be to clean up by creating your own. Fill a pan or bowl with water and add cooking oil. Try different ways of cleaning up the oil: gathering it into one place using sting, skimming it off with a spoon, or soaking it up with paper towels or cotton balls. What else could you use? What works best? How do scientists try to clean up real oil spills?

Easy bird treats
Tips: making your backyard wildlife friendly budget

Purchase Junior Animal Habitats Badge

Junior Drawing

Junior Drawing

March 23, 2020
Experiment with different materials
To start our drawing badge we are going to crerate a still life drawing. A still life is a drawing of inanimate objects. It might be fruit or toys or whatever you find around the house.

Next you are going to find 3 different materials to draw with. Some ideas of what you might have are pencils, pens, crayons, chalk, markers, or highlighters. You are going to draw your still life three different times, once with each material you grabbed. You will find that it is different trying to draw with different materials. Artists will have different mediums they perfer.

Do you prefer one of the ones you used? Did you have to change how you drew because you were using different material? Make sure to sign your work. An artist always signs her drawings or paintings.

March 24, 2020
Learn to add shading
Shading is a major part of drawing!. Think of a face-depending on the light, a person will havesome areas on their face that are darker thanothers. Showing the dark areas is shading!. lt adds depth and makes the picture look more rea!

Today, you are going to do a self-portrait with some special kinds of shading: hatching and cross hatching. Hatching is when you use lines that are drawn close together to make shading. The closer the lines are together, the darker that part of the shading is. Cross-hatching is when you go back over the hatching with lines in the other direction to make a grid.

Again, the closer you make the lines together, the darker that section will be. To draw your self portrait, you will need a mirror, some paper, a pencil and some good lighting. If you have a more direct light on your face such as a lamp, it will make more dramatic or darker shadows that are easier to see.

Using the mirror, draw your face using hatching and cross hatching to create shading where the shadows are on your face. Where do you need to show more shadow? Does hatching orcrosshatching make your face iook more real in the drawing?

March 25, 2020
Get some prespective
Perspective means that some obiects in a picture look farther away than others. For example, if you draw a big house at the bottom of your paper and a tiny dog at the top, the dog will look like it's behind the house in the distance.

If you've ever drawn a cube so it looks 3D, you've used perspective. Perspective seems like something that we would have always used, but up until the 14th century (the 1300s) no one really tried to use it to make thier drawings more realistic.

For today's activity, you are going to imagine that you are on a hot air balloon ride. You could be over you neighborhood, or town or a far off place like a village in the mountains or a forest hideaway. You are going to draw what you would see from your hot air balloon ride. How would building look from way up high? What things would look smaller because they are further away from you?

March 26, 2020
Become a Graphic Artist
A logo is a symbol. Businesses or groups often have them and print them on everything from cards to stationery to T-shirts. You can find logos in all parts of life, weither it is the iconic Girl Scout trefoil, the McDonald's golden arches or your favorite sports team.

Today you are going to design a logo for yourself. You are going to think of symbols and colors that you can use to create a logo for you. Remember that logo are suppose to be easily recognizable and catch your attention.

March 27, 2020
Make a Masterpiece and Show it Off
Use all your new skills to create a masterpiece. Choose your favorite materials, and use shading,perspective, and your imagination-even if you're drawing from real life.

After you are done, create an at home art gallery to show off your work or join our digital gallery. With the help of an adult, post your art to facebook with #gscijuniordrawing. Using this hashtag we can go through and see all of the great art you and your fellow Juniors have been doing.

Purchase Junior Drawing Badge

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Animal Helper

Cadette Animal Helpers

March 23, 2020
Explore the connection between humans and animals
Learn about how animals help humans in this article, then share with a parent or sibling one new fact you have learned. As a bonus, create a collage of pictures of animals helping humans; use this as a screensaver as inspiration as you earn this badge! 

March 24, 2020
Find out how animals help keep people safe
Check out this video about animal heroes. Draw a picture of your favorite “hero” story and share your artwork on social media.  

March 25, 2020
Know how animals help people emotionally
Call five friends or family members who own a pet. Ask them how their pet(s) make them feel better emotionally and capture their responses on paper. For more fun, make up front page of a newspaper featuring these five pet owners and their beloved animals. You can search for a newspaper template online or draw one by hand. 

March 26, 2020
Check out how animals help people who have disabilities
Watch this video about dogs that are trained to be service animals, then record a video or put on a short skit about what you’ve learned. Be sure to share your knowledge with a friend or family member. 

March 27, 2020
Learn about how animals might help in the future.
Practice being a scientist. Observe an animal in action – whether it’s a bird at your feeder, a raccoon sneaking around at night, or your own pet pooch – and think about what animal behaviors could be used to help humans.  Then, make up a story about how that animal ‘saved the day,’ based on what you’ve observed.

Purchase Cadette Animals Helpers Badge

Cadette Comic Book Artist

Cadette Comic Book Artist

Newspaper cartoons, comic books, graphic novels...comic artist is a broad, exciting, and growing field. Comics are sometimes described as "sequential art". Some can be impactful with just one panel. So, what is a comic, exactly? It is a visual story however you would like to tell it. Go for it!

March 23, 2020
Delve into the world of comics
Take a look at your favorite comics and look back at the the greatest comic book artist from the last quarter century.  When looking at the great comic book artists pay special attention to their unique creativity, distinct or influential style, longevity, impact, and artwork.

Do they depict a specific time period, evoke emotion, and/or transport you to a far-off vivid world? They need to keep you dreaming when you close the book. Start a comic book artist journal to record your ideas and inspiration.

March 24, 2020
Choose a story to tell
Come up with a story to tell; it can be a moment in time or a saga. Brainstorm a story by gathering experiences from your life, draw inspiration from a book/movie, or simply use your wild imagination to make something up. Keep your ideas in your writing journal.

March 25, 2020
Draw it out
Start a rough sketch of your characters. It can be stick figures; just bring them to life by drawing tracing or using a "how to guide" or software. Click here for an online guide to drawing comic characters.

March 26, 2020
Frame it in four panels
Put your character into action by framing them. Framing is drawing your characters in action through a series of panels. Click here for a template of four panels. When drawing your characters, pay special attention to facial expressions and body posture. Click here for tips on drawing emotions.

March 27, 2020
Add words
Some comics do not have words; however, most comics are a mix of words and pictures that work together. You can do this by adding dialogue bubbles. When multiple characters are in one panel, the one on the left should speak first. Write your character's word in oval bubbles connected by fine lines. Instead of dialogue boxes, you can write a third-person narrative at the bottom of each panel. For tips on adding dialogue click here.

Purchase Cadette Comic Book Artist Badge

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Voice for Animals

Senior Voice for Animals

March 23, 2020
Find out about domestic animals
Interview an animal rescue worker. Find out about what issues are currently a problem and also what they decided to be an animal rescuer. Share your interview with other girls!

Find a local animal shelter

March 24, 2020
Investigate animals used for science
Research a beauty product that is used by teens. Check out the guidelines for animal testing and see if it's cruelty-free. Once you find out the process analyze the process and write a brief description on how they use the animals to test the product. If they do not use animals to test the product see if you can find their reason for why not. Do this with two companies one that does use animals and one that does not. Compare and contrast the two.   

March 25, 2020
Explore Animals in Husbandry
Take a virutal tour of a farm tell what you learned to your frends and family.

March 26, 2020
Zoos as Entertainment
Take a more critical view of zoos as entertainment. Zoos justify their existence by saying that without their aid, many animals in the wild would be extinct, and that the animals currently in the zoos are safe, comfortable, and cared for.

Choose one zoo (it can be one in your area, national, or international), and research their welfare guidelines. How do they ensure the general wellbeing of their animals? How do they meet the animal’s biological needs (like a lion’s need to roam, a gibbon’s need for social relationships)? Many zoos are AZA (Association of Zoos & Aquariums) accredited, so this may be source of regulations and standards to look at.

Then, look into how these animals in captivity compare to animals in the wild. How big is the enclosure or habitat of the animals in captivity? What’s the animal’s range in the wild? 

March 27, 2020
Animal Issues

Look into animal issues. Hold a debate with your family or online with a fellow Girl Scout or friend about one of these topics:

  • Wearing fur, leathers or other animal products vs not wearing them or Hunting vs not hunting

Be sure to do your research ahead of time. Remember that this should be a debate and not an argument, so be sure that everyone has their chance to speak and get their points and counterpoints across.

Watch this video with some tips on The Art of Debate.

Senior Voice for Animals Badge

Senior Collage Artist

Senior Collage Artist

March 23, 2020
Explore Collage
Use your computer to read about three collage time periods or styles. You might explore paper collages by 12-Century Japanese calligraphers, research mideval artists who enhanced religious images with fibers, gemstones, and precious metals, or look at the work of modern artists who pushed the boundaries of the medium. During your search, pay attention to composition, color, material, and message, as those are the collages you'll be making in the following steps! Visit the links below to assist in your search.

Explore the Cutting Edge History and Evolution of Collage Art

The History of Collage Art

March 24, 2020
Focus on Composition
Create a physical or digital photo collage. You can use physical photographs, digital scans, or find free images online. You might choose a theme, such as “favorite Girl Scout experiences”, “friends/ family”, or “pets of everyone I love”.

Before starting, visualize how you want your collage to look. How do you want your viewer’s eyes to travel across your work? How and where you place the visual elements in your collage can change the mood and experience the piece creates. Be sure to check out the links below for examples, inspiration, and free online digital collage makers!

March 25, 2020
Create with Color
Create a collage with a color theme. This might mean colors that evoke a patriotic theme: red, white, and blue. Or Victorian-era colors:grey, brown, teal, and purplish red. Think about cool color combinations, such a turquoise and silver, or your favorite Girl Scout colors.

You can create a physical or digital copy of a color themed collage. Be sure to check out the links below for examples, inspiration, and free online digital collage makers!

March 26, 2020
Use Found Objects
What you've tried with composition and color should help you choose objects that will fit together well. Choose a theme and create your own collage using 3-D materials and everyday objects.

A tech theme might have comuper chips, old cell phone parts, and colored cords. A game theme might have Monopoly peices, dice, and a spinner. A cooking theme could have a whisk, cookie sheet, and spatula.

Or, you might decide to pick things that don't seem to have a rhyme or reason- that depends on your vision as an artist. You can place your 3-D objects in your collage and take a photo of your masterpiece so the objects can be reused later on.

March 27, 2020
Share a Message
A collage is a fantastic way to share a powerful message. What kind of composition, color, or textures say "This is what matters to me and why"?

Experiment with bringing your meaning to life. Create a self portrait collage. It doesn't have to be your face- just a piece that tells the world something about you. If you're a girl with a sweet tooth, you could make art with your collection of jelly beans. If you're an entrepreneur, you could make a collage using play coins and money. Or create a collage using photos of your Girl Scout experiences, and different badges you've enjoyed earning!

This collage can be done physically or digitally, and you can incorporate 3D materals, or use a collection of images for a one dimensional masterpiece.

Purchase Senior Collage Artist Badge

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Photographer

Ambassador Photographer

March 23, 2020
Explores the power of photography
Go to a virtual photography exhibit. Look at each photo without reading the accompanying text and see if you can “read” the story it tells. Note what makes at least 20 photos powerful, so you can try the techniques.

Art Steps Contemporary Photography
Virtual Gallery Exhibition

For extra fun you can create your own virtual photography exhibit at the artsteps.com.

March 24, 2020
Focus on Composition
Shoot five landscapes. Capture a day in the life using the camera on your phone. Shoot a scene in your life at least five times throughout your day.

Creative Excercise: Photograph a Day in Your Life
Photo Prompts for Capturing a Day in the Life

March 25, 2020
Focus on Light
Shoot five portraits or still lifes. Grow your image. Start small and photograph one person or item, then, begin to add others, so your image “grows” in each of your five photos. See how the light affects its shadows and shapes, and how different textures and colors interact.

Tip: A black-velvet background absorbs unwanted light and reflection. You might, also,try a white piece of paper as a background, but watch for shadows.

March 26, 2020
Focus on Motion
Take photos of faces in motion. Capture five different faces in action, or the same person with five different active expressions – perhaps a growing smile, a nod, a wink, a blink, or a vigorous head shake.

March 27, 2020
Tell a story with photography
Make a digital slide show. Post your photographic story in a private online space for family and friends. Prezi is a great online platform or you could use google slides!

Purchase Ambassador Photography

Gold Award

Path to Gold Award

March 23, 2020
Choosing an issue
Finding one issue you care about can be difficult. With business/organizations/schools being closed during this time it can be difficult to visit your community. But, technology is on our side. Watch the link to become inspired and then go to your community website and look at the organizations/schools and what their mission statement is. Write down organizations that you feel best align with the issues you care about. You will need this list for the next part.

March 24, 2020
Take action project
Click here to view how to create your take action project form the gound up.

March 25, 2020
Community service project
Click here to help you understand what is a community service project and what is a take action project.

March 26, 2020
Sustainability
Click here to determine what sustainability means.

March 27, 2020
Gold Award Chat
Now that you had time to review parts of the award.. lets chat! I will answer any questions that you may have to help you reach your goal!

Webinar Information
Friday, Mar 27, 2020 @ 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM (CDT)

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone with the link below.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/634939549

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States (Toll Free): 1 877 309 2073

Access Code: 634-939-549

New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when your first meeting starts:https://global.gotomeeting.com/install/634939549

Girl Scout Gold Award

Week 3 - March 31 - April 3

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Good Neighbor

Daisy Good Neighbor

March 30, 2020
Explore Your School
Groups of people are called communities. You’re part of lots of communities! Your Daisy troop is one, and so is your class at school. You can help your communities by being a good neighbor. Find out how in this badge.

Explore your school: You’re part of a community at school. That means everyone works together to help make your school a nice place to learn new things!

  • Show your school spirit. Draw a picture of your favorite place at school. It could be your classroom or the library. In your picture, show what you do there.
  • Call up a Girl Scout friend and talk about your favorite part of school. Talk about how it is different now and what you miss most about going into school. How the different people at your school work together?
  • For more fun: Make up a cheer about your school! Teach it to your family or friends.

March 31, 2020
Discover Your City or Town
 In your city or town, neighbors work together in lots of different places. These places help make sure everyone has what they need. How many different places can you think of?

Make your town. Get together with your family and create the different parts of your town. Using a map of your town you can create a diagram of some of the major streets in the town. You can map it out on the floor; sidewalk or you could draw it. Make it out of blocks or recycled objects like milk cartons, or sculpt it out of clay or salt dough. You can make it life size! Try to include all of the places that you think are important to your neighbors in your city or town. Does your town have schools, a fire station, a library, and a Town Hall? Can you think of other places? How do you think the people in each place act like good neighbors to one another? Why is that important? Take a friend through your town virtual.

Simple Salt Dough Recipe

April 1, 2020
See What Makes Your State Special
There are 50 states in the United States. They’re all neighbors to one another, and each one is special in its own way. When you put them together, they make a big community— and you’re a part of it! See what makes your state unique in this step.

Get to know your state.

  • Look at the map of the United States. Find your state and color it in. The circle on the map shows where your capital city is. Have you ever been there?
  • Get together with your Girl Scout friends and talk about what makes your state special. Can you find someone from Illinois that was a good neighbor? Reach a story about that person.
  • Why do you think people should come to visit? Were your parents or friends born outside of Illinois? What are your favorite things about your state?
  • Research and share 5 facts about Illinois to a Girl Scout friend.
  • For more fun: Help make a type of food that your state is known for, like lobster rolls in Maine or pecan pie in Texas. What is Illinois?

Unites States of America Map

April 2, 2020
Each State is Unique
Daisies may know the name of her town and that she lives in a country called the United States, she might not quite understand which state she lives in or even what a state is, for that matter!

You can explain that the country is very big, and so it’s divided up into many different parts, kind of like one of her favorite puzzles.

Each state is unique, but when you put all the states together, they make up our whole country. Reach the states that boarded Illinois. Find 3 interesting facts about each state. Look up different state parks in each state and plan a visit.

April 3, 2020
Become a Great Neighbor
There are so many ways neighbors can work together to help one another. Each person—including ourselves—has an important role to play in a caring, cooperative community.

Send out thank you cards to people who help run your community, volunteer to help clean your town, shop at your local business, take your neighbors trash cans out, or maybe get to know your neighbors on your block. Become a great neighbor.

Purchase Daisy Good Neighbor Badge

Daisy Eco Learner

Daisy Eco Learner

March 30, 2020
Be prepared to protect nature before you go outdoors
Have a “Be Prepared” show-and-tell. When you go outside, there are some things you will want to bring, and some you’ll want to leave at home.

Gather items from around your house and make two piles. One is for “take outdoors” and one is for “leave behind.” Think of things like a toaster or a toy (leave behind) and water bottle, sunscreen, and bug spray (take outdoors). Then show an adult your two piles and have them guess what each is for.

March 31, 2020
Keep living things safe when you walk in nature
Make a nature circle. On a trail or sidewalk, lay a circle of string at least 3 feet long next to the walk or path. Look in the circle and count how many things you find that live there, like plants or bugs. What would be injured if you walked off a path?

April 1, 2020
How to protect nature from trash
Make a nature circle. On a trail or sidewalk, lay a circle of string at least 3 feet long next to the walk or path. Look in the circle and count how many things you find that live there, like plants or bugs. What would be injured if you walked off a path?

Purchase Daisy Eco Learner Badge

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Snacks

Brownie Snacks Badge

March 30, 2020
Find out about different types of snacks
Did you know there is no such thing as a "bad" food? It's true! However, there are foods that we should eat more often than others.

Follow the link below to view different types of snacks. These snacks are divided into 3 categories- Go, Slow, and WHOA.

  • "Go" foods are natural, have very little to no processing, and give us lots of energy!
  • "WHOA" foods are generally the most processed and are highest in unhealthy fats, added sugars, and salt. We should only eat WHOA foods every once in a while!
  • "Slow" foods fall in between Go and Whoa foods; Slow foods are more nutritious than WHOA foods but shouldn’t be eaten as frequently as GO foods.

Make a list or draw a picture of your favorite snacks! By using the links below, can you determine what category your favorite snacks fall into?

Make a list or draw a picture of some Go or Slow snacks you'd like to try to give you energy to last throughout the day!

Dynamic Diet's Food Picture Cards

Go-Slow-WHOA List

March 31, 2020
Make a savory snack
Savory is a term used to describe a snack that is full of flavor and tasty- it can be salty, crunchy, or spicy. Savory snacks are not sweet, but they pair well with sweet snacks!

A good example of a sweet and savory snack is trail mix. With permission from an adult, you can make your own unique trail mix using the ingredients you love; you might even be able to make a tasty trail mix utilizing the snacks you have at home!

Examples of savory snacks: - Nuts and Seeds, Corn or tortilla chips, Veggie Chips, Popcorn, Pretzels, Gold Fish, Crackers

April 1, 2020
Try a Sweet Snack
If you like desserts, you'll like these snacks! Sweet snacks are best to eat on special occassions.

For this step, you'll be making your own cookies! First, find a chocolate chip cookie recipe. You may already have one your family uses, or have an adult help you find one in a cook book or on the internet. We've also added a few simple examples. But there's a twist! Instead of chocolate chips, add s omething else. It could be candy bits, marshamallows, dried fruit, or anything else you can think of that sounds yummy! Take a picture and share on Facebook using #GSCIShinesOn.

April 2, 2020
Snack for Energy
Sometimes you don’t have time to sit at home and enjoy a snack.  So try some snacks that are good for you and perfect for taking along.  When you’re on the go, it’s important to have energy snacks that help you more and think and be strong.

Sometimes you don’t have time to sit at home and enjoy a snack. So try some snacks that are good for you and perfect for taking along.  When you’re on the go, it’s important to have energy snacks that help you more and think and be strong.

April 3, 2020
Slurp a Snack
Some snacks are best in a cup. Just because these snacks are liquid doesn't mean they're any less delicios. And they can still be great for you if you choose the right ingredients!

Pick any of these combinations and toss them in a blender with the help of an adult to make a delicious and healthy smoothie. Once blended you can add ice and re-blend of just leave the ice as is.

Pineapple smoothie
• 2 cups of frozen pineapple chunks
• 1 cup unsweetened almond milk
• 1 tbsp. honey

Strawberry smoothie
• 2 cups frozen strawberries
• 1 cup milk
• 2 tbsps. honey

Blueberry smoothie
• 2 cups frozen blueberries
• 1 cup coconut milk
• 1 frozen banana

Peanut butter smoothie
• 1 frozen banana
• 2 tbsps. peanut butter
• 2 tbsps. cocoa powder
• 1/3 cup water

Purchase Brownie Snacks Badge

Brownie Bugs

Brownie Bugs Badge

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this badge.

March 30, 2020

Draw a Bug Poster

March 31, 2020
Try a Bug Craft

April 1, 2020
See Bugs in Action

April 2, 2020
Build a Hornet Nest

April 3, 2020
Take a Bug Field Triip

Purchase Brownie Bugs Badge

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Simple Meals

Junior Simple Meals

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this badge.

March 30, 2020
Step Up Your Skills with a Pro

March 31, 2020
Whip Up a Great Breakfast

April 1, 2020
Fix a Healthy Lunch

April 2, 2020
Create a Dessert

April 3, 2020
Make Your Own Meal

Purchase Junior Simple Meals Badge

Junior Flowers

Junior Flowers

March 30, 2020
Uncover the Science of Flowers
Botanists are scientists that study plants, like flowers. They track the types of flowers, where they grow and the parts of them.

Go out into your yard or neighborhood with a notebook and draw three different flowers you see as detailed as you can. If there are no flowers yet in your area, you can look up some pictures of them online.

Try to see if you can find out info about ones that do grow in your area. You'll notice that flowers can look very different from each other, even though they are all flowers.

Try this game to learn the parts of the flower and see if you notice any of the same parts in your drawings.

After that, choose your favorite flower and learn a little bit about its history by clicking here.

March 31, 2020
Look Under the Petals
Just like people in your family might share common traits, the same goes for flower familes.

Look online and find a flower family you like. Click here to see a lot of different families. You will see them listed by scientific names which are names that botonists use so they know which plant they mean no matter what language they speak and the families common name in english which is what you will most likely know it by.

Then draw pictures of different flowers within that family. Make a flower family tree with your art!

April 1, 2020
How Flowers Help People
Many flowers are edible, which means we can eat them. Some are edible as the flower itself and some you have to wait for it to become fruit.

We use flowering plants to cook all the time! From your favorite fruits like apples and oranges, to spices and herbs like mint or oregano, flowers are a tasty treat.

Go around your house and see how many items that are flowers or come from flowers you can find. Some might not be that easy to tell. The tea Earl Grey actually comes from a flower that might find growing here in the summer, the bergamot.

After you have found all of the items, make a tasty treat using a flowering plant! An idea are these tasty banana bites from our friends at Girl Scouts of Southern Nevada.

April 2, 2020
Have Fun With Flowers
Follow along with the videos to make an oragami bouquet!

April 3, 2020
Send a Message in Flower Code
Many flowers are symbols that send a specific message when you give them. You probably have seen red roses to symbolize love, but there are many more. In older times. people could send full messages with these flower codes.

Today, you are going to make a flower arrangement to send a message. You can use flowers if you have them on hand, paper flowers like you made in the last step or draw your flowers. Think of who you'd like to give flowers to and what you would like them to say. Do you want to say thank you to someone for something they did or do you want to tell someone that you miss them or tell them how mcuh they mean to you? It's up to you! Don't worry about trying to say something like a sentence, flowers tell more of a mood.

The link with today's activity will tell you some common flowers and the symbolism they usually have. The first link with give you some common flowers used in arrangements with a picture of them. If you are looking for something more specific try looking in the Farmer's Almanac which has even more plant and flower options. Flowers are such a fun gift to recieve and picking flowers that mean something special can make it an even more meaningful gift. 

Common Flowers and Symbolism

Purchase Junior Flowers Badge

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Trees

Cadette Trees Badge

March 30, 2020
Try Some Tree Fun
Take a virtual tour of an orchard, to understand and appreciate the bounty trees provide!

Next, create a simple dish with a product from Take a virtual tour of an orchard, to understand and appreciate the bounty trees provide! Next, create a simple dish with a product from the orchard.

Southern Fried Apples Recipe
Peach Crumble Recipe

March 31, 2020
Dig Into the Amazing Science of Trees
Now you are going to learn how to identify various types of trees!  Download the Leafsnap app and get started! You simply take a picture of the leaf and the app will identify the appropriate tree for you.

Take a refreshing walk around your neighborhood and see what you can find! Take note of how many different trees you find and if they are native to your area or if they were planted there. Enjoy the fresh air!

April 1, 2020
Make a Creative Project Starring Trees
It's time to get creative! Using your knowledge of trees, create a unique piece of art for your home!

Click here to view a fun, new way to paint with q-tips! What colors did you see on your walk? Did you see any flowers in bloom? Incorporate your observations into your art and hang your masterpiece up!

April 2, 2020
Explore the Connection Between People and Trees
Trees help people in so many ways! From shelter and paper, to food and fuel, trees benefit us in every part of our lives!

For this step, we will focus on medicinal trees and the various ailments they can treat. Make a note of one kind of tree you could plant and use!

Next, choose one of the following tree-related careers to research: Arborist, Landscape Architect, Park Planner, Soil Scientist, Nature Writer, Tree Biologist.

Find answers to the following questions:

  • What do they do?
  • Where do they work?
  • How do they help others?

April 3, 2020
Help Trees Thrive
Do you have $1.00? That's all you need to plant a tree! One Tree Planted is a non-profit organization focused on global reforestation. You can choose to plant one tree for one dollar across 5 continents! How cool is that?!

Review your options while researching this awesome organization, then "buy" one tree. You will find great educational videos on their website, as well as, a free poster!

Purchase Cadette Trees Badge

Cadette New Cuisines

Cadette New Cuisines Badge

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this badge.

March 30, 2020
Make a dish from another country

March 31, 2020
Create a dish from another region of the United States

April 1, 2020
Whip up another dish from another time period

April 2, 2020
Cook a dish that makes a statement

April 3, 2020
Share your dish on a culinary "tour"

Purchase Cadette New Cuisines Badge

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Sky

Senior Sky  Badge

March 30, 2020
Watch the Skies
If you really want to see the night sky, use a telescope (perhaps there's one at a local college or planetarium). But first, learn the parts of a telescope and how to use one. If possible, use a tracking telescope, or look through telescopes with different magnifications. 

Focus on the night sky, download the app called Skyview Lite. The app can replace your telescope if you don't have and is a good alternative because it works even though it is cloudy.

Identify 10 constellations and 8 noticable starts. Click here to find out how the North Star has been used for navigation.

March 31, 2020
Investigate Science in the Skies
Now that you've spent some time enjoying the sky, get to know it on a more scientific level. Find out the basics about the sky, its atmosphere, planets, and weather.

Visit a planetarium or astronomical observatory- since this option is unavailable at this time due to the stay at home order, we are bringing the museum to you. Watch this virtual tour of the Rochester Museum and Science Center Strasenburgh Planetarium.

April 1, 2020
Explore Connections Between People and Flight
Our dream of flying dates back as far as humans exist. Prehistoric cave drawings depict winged men. In the 1500's, artists Leonardo da Vinci drew an ornithopter, an aircraft with wings designed to flap like a bird's. Aviation pioneers contributed ideas that led to airplane flight and rocket launches.

Build a model plane, rocket, or space exploration vehicle. Click here to build a rocket that will fly using a little science. Experiment with the different amount to see what combination would make your rocket fly high!

April 2, 2020
Help Clear Sky Pollution
Take a look at the pollution in our skies and on other planets and find out what you can do.

Explore air pollution-most pollution is caused by fossil fuels: burning coal, oil, and gasoline from power plants, furnances, and cars. Watch the youtube video about air pollution. Then click here to visit the NASA shows that shows how the impact of the COVID-19 virus has had on air pollution. Share with others what you have learned.

April 3, 2020
Create Sky Art
Now that you've taken an expansive tour of the sky , use your inspiration to explore and create your own sky art.

Make sky art. This might be a scale mobile of planets, a sky or constellation mural or map, or a series of photographs showing the changing sky throughout the day. Create something that will celebrate the wonders of the sky and share it in a presentation ,exhibit or tour. If you are needing some inspiration check out this YouTube tutorial on creating a galaxy.

Purchase Senior Sky Badge


 

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Water

Ambassador Water Badge

March 30, 2020
Have Fun Reflecting on Your Relationship with Water
Water is easy to take for granted. As you dive into this badge, take this opportunity to reflect on what water means to you, where it drops into your life, and what possibilities and challenges you see reflecting on its sparkling (cloud, clear, stormy?) surface.

First, let's spend some time thinking about and reflecting on your relationship with water. One way to do this is to visit water in its natural state. Bring a notebook and pen, camera, or other way to record what you think and feel when you're around water. Be sure to maintain social distance while doing this! Most communities have streams, lakes, or rivers. Be sure not to go alone and be cautious while exploring.

If you don't have access to any natural bodies of water, here are a few videos you can watch. Listen to the sounds of the water and try to imagine you're there.

March 31, 2020
Celebrate Water Art and Create Your Ow
View this  slideshow includes five poems about or related to water by female poets. As you’re reading, take notes about what you think the poem means, how it feels. You might try researching the poet more, or reading how other people have analyzed the poem.

Once you’ve read and reflected on the selected poems, write your own or write a review of your favorite one.

Girl Scouts of Central Illinois would love to read what you wrote, or see a picture of you workin on it! Share using #GSCIShinesOn and tag Girl Scouts of Central Illinois on Facebook.

April 1, 2020
Find Out About Water Issues
Humans have always been dependent on water. Civilizations were built around rivers. Where it's dry, humans often create artificial bodies of water--reservoirs, harbors, and waterways.

But our relationship with water isn't always a happy story. We also face pollution, waste, and natural disaster. Take a closer look at a water issue and share what you find out! You could organize a Zoom call with younger Girl Scouts, create an informational video to share online, or an infographic that you can share on social media.

Here are some sources to get you started researching some current hot topics in water issues, or pick a different water issue you're interested in. Be sure to find at least 2 additional sources before you share what you've learned (3 total if you don't use one listed below).

Girl Scouts of Central Illinois would love to learn from you, too! Share your project with us using #GSCIShinesOn and tag Girl Scouts of Central Illinois on Facebook.

April 2, 2020
Exlpore Water Solutions
There are myriad water issues, to be sure. But since civilization depends on water, humans have always used their innovation and ingenuity to find, treat, gather, filter, conserve, and protect this precious resource.

Based on what you learned about water issues in step 3, come up with 10 questions you have for a water expert. Be sure to ask questions about their career path, such as what they studied in school or how they got the job they're currently in.

Open the survey to read a little about the scientists to help guide your questions. Submit these questions in this form and GSCI will pick the most frequently asked and best questions to ask a real water scientist! We'll email you their responses!

Enter your questions here.

April 3, 2020
Educate and Inspire Others with a Splash
Here's your opportunity to take everything you've learned and enjoyed and use it to help others appreciate water. If you've already shared some of your findings, do it now in a different way.

This step should feel like a focused culmination of your badge work. Some options might be to organize an online activity or younger Girl Scouts, write an article or blog post to share online or submit to your local newspaper, or make a display that you can be ready to share in person once we are able to gather again!

Whatever you decide to do, share it with Girl Scouts of Central Illinois using #GSCIShinesOn and tag Girl Scouts of Central Illinois on Facebook!

Purchase Ambassador Water Badge

Week 4 - April 6 - April 10

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Money Counts

Daisy Money Counts

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Money Counts badge.

Purchase Daisy Money Counts Badge

Daisy Uniquely ME

Daisy Uniquely ME

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Uniquely ME badge.

Free patches are available in the GSCI Trefoil Boutiques.

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Money Manager

Brownie Money Manager

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Money Manager badge.

Purchase Browine Money Manager Badge

Brownie My Best Self

Brownie My Best Self

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie My Best Self badge.

Purchase Brownie My Best Self Badge

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Business Owner

Junior Business Owner

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Business Owner badge.

Purchase Junior Business Owner Badge

Junior Staying Fit

Junior Staying Fit

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Staying Fit badge.

Purchase Junior Staying Fit Badge

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Budgeting

Cadette Budeting

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Budgeting badge.

Purchase Cadette Budgeting

Cadette Eating for You

Cadette Eating For You

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Eating For You badge.

Purchase Cadette Eating For You Badge

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Financing My Future

Senior Financing My Future

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Financing My Future badge.

Purchase Senior Financing My Future

Senior Women's Health

Senior Women's Health

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Women's Health badge.

Purchase Senior Women's Health Badge

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador On My Own

Ambassador On My Own 

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador On My Own badge.

Purchase Ambassador On My Own Badge

Ambassador Uniquely ME

Ambassador Uniquely ME

April 6-April 10, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador  Uniquely ME badge.

Free patches are available in the GSCI Trefoil Boutiques.

Week 5 - April 13 - April 14

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Safety Award

Daisy Safety Award

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Safety Award.

Purchase Daisy Safety Award

Daisy Cybersecurity

Daisy Cybersecurity Basics

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Cybersecurity Basics badge.

Purchase Daisy Cybersecurity Badge

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Safety Award

Brownie Safety Award

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Safety Award.

Purchase Brownie Safety Pin

Brownie Home Scientist

Brownie Home Scientist

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Home Scientist badge.

Purchase Brownie Home Scientist Badge

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Safety

Junior Safety Award

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Safety Award.

Purchase Junior Safety Award

Junior Entertainment Technology

Junior Entertainment Technology

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Entertainment Technology badge.

Purchase Junior Entertainment Technology

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Safety Award

Cadette Safety Award

April 13-April 170, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Safety Award.

Purchase Cadette Safety Award

Cadette Science of Happiness

Cadette Science of Happiness

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Science of Happiness badge.

Purchase Cadette Science of Happiness

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Safety Award

Senior Safety Award

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Safety Award.

Purchase Senior Safety Award

Senior Science of Style

Senior Science of Style

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Science of Style badge.

Purchase Senior Science of Style

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Safety Award

Ambassador Safety Award

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Safety Award.

Purchase Ambassador Safety Award

Ambassador Cybersecurity Basics

Ambassador Cybersecurity Basics

April 13-April 17, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Cybersecurity Basics badge.

Purchase Ambassador Cybersecurity Basics

Week 6 - April 20 - April 24

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Free to Be Me

Daisy Free to Be Me

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Free to Be Me patch.

Free to Be Me patches are avaialable in all Treqoil Boutiques.

Daisy Space Science Explorer

Daisy Space Science Explorer

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Space Science Explorer badge.

Purchase Daisy Space Science Explorer Badge

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Dancer

Brownie Dancer

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Dancer badge.

Purchase Brownie Dance Badge

Brownie Space Science Adventurer

Brownie Space Science Adventurer

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Space Science Adventurer badge.

Purchase Brownie Space Science Adventurer Badge

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Musician

Junior Musician

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Musician badge.

Purchase Junior Musician Badge

Junior Space Investigator

Junior Space Science Investigator

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Space Science Investigator badge.

Purchase Junior Space Science Investigator Badge

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Public Speaking

Cadette Public Speaking

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Public Speaking badge.

Purchase Cadette Public Speaking Badge

Cadette Space Science Researcher

Cadette Space Science Researcher

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Space Science Researcher badge.

Purchase Cadette Space Science Researcher Badge

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Troupe Performer

Senior Troupe Performer

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Troupe Performer badge.

Purchase Senior Troupe Performer Badge

Senior Space Science Expert

Senior Space Science Expert

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Space Science Expert badge.

Purchase Senior Space Science Expert Badge

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Free to Be Me

Ambassador Free to Be Me

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Free to Be Me patch.

Free to Be Me patches are avaialable in all Treqoil Boutiques.

Ambassador Space Science Master

Ambassador Space Science Master

April 20-April 24, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Space Science Master Badge.

Purchase Ambassador Space Science Master badge

Week 7 - April 27 - May 1

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Quarantined

Daisy Quarantined

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Quarantined patch.

Purchase Quarantined '20 patch

Daisy Manners

Daisy Manners 

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Manners.

There is no Daisy Manners badge.

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Quarantined

Brownie Quarantined

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Quarantined patch.

Purchase Quarantined '20 patch

Brownie Making Friends

Brownie Making Friends

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Making Friends badge.

Purchase Brownie Making Friends Badge

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Quarantined

Junior Quarantined

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Quarantined patch.

Purchase Quarantined '20 patch

Junior Social Butterfly

Junior Social Butterfly

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Social Butterfly badge.

Purchase Junior Social Butterfly Badge

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Quarantined

Cadette Quarantined

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Quarantined patch.

Purchase Quarantined '20 patch

Cadette Netiquette

Cadette Netiquette

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Netiquette badge.

Purchase Cadette Netiquette Badge

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Quarantined

Senior Quarantined

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Quarantined patch.

Purchase Quarantined '20 patch.

Senior Business Etiquette

Senior Business Etiquette

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Business Etiquette badge.

Purchase Senior Business Etiquette Badge

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Quarantined

Ambassador Quarantined

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Quarantined patch.

Purchase Quarantined '20 patch.

Ambassador Manners

Ambassadors Manners 

April 27-May 1, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Manners.

There is no Ambassador Manners badge.

Week 8 - May 4 - May 8

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Buddy Camper

Daisy Buddy Camper

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Buddy Camper badge.

Purchase Daisy Buddy Camper Badge

Daisy Asthma Awareness

Daisy Asthma Awareness

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Asthma Awareness patch.

Information on how to receive the Daisy Asthma Awareness patch is at the end of the presentation.

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Cabin Camper

Brownie Cabin Camper

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Cabin Camper badge.

Purchase Brownie Cabin Camper Badge

Brownie Asthma Awareness

Brownie Asthma Awareness

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Asthma Awareness patch.

Information on how to receive the Brownie Asthma Awareness patch is at the end of the presentation.

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Eco Camper

Jnuuir Eco Camper

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Eco Camper badge.

Purchase Junior Eco Camper Badge

Junior Asthma Awareness

Junior Asthma Awareness

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Asthma Awareness patch.

Information on how to receive the Junior Asthma Awareness patch is at the end of the presentation.

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Primitive Camper

Cadette Primitive Camper

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Primitive Camper badge.

Purchase Cadette Primitive Camper Badge

Cadette Asthma Awareness

Cadette Asthma Awareness

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Asthma Awareness patch.

Information on how to receive the Cadette Asthma Awareness patch is at the end of the presentation.

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Adventure Camper

Senior Adventure Camper

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Adventure Camper badge.

Purchase Senior Adventure Camper Badge

Senior Asthma Awareness

Senior Asthma Awareness

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Asthma Awareness patch.

Information on how to receive the Senior Asthma Awareness patch is at the end of the presentation.

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Survival Camper

Ambassador Survival Camper

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador  Survival Camper badge.

Purchase Ambassador Survival Camper Badge

Ambassador Asthma Awareness

Ambassador Asthma Awareness

May 4-8, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Asthma Awareness patch.

Information on how to receive the Ambassador Asthma Awareness patch is at the end of the presentation.

Week 9 May 11 - May 15

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Citizen Scientist

Daisy Citizen Scientist

May 11-May 15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Daisy Citizen Scientist Badge

Daisy Outdoor Challenge
Outdoor Badge Small

Daisy Outdoor Challenge

May 11-15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Outdoor Challenge patch.

The Outdoor Challenge patch may be purchased in all GSCI Trefoil Boutiques. They can be reached at 888-623-1237.

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Citizen Scientist

Brownie Citizen Scientist

May 11-May 15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Brownie Citizen Scientist Badge

Brownie Outdoor Challenge
Outdoor Badge Small

Brownie Outdoor Challenge

May 11-15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Outdoor Challenge patch.

The Outdoor Challenge patch may be purchased in all GSCI Trefoil Boutiques. They can be reached at 888-623-1237.

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Citizen Scientist

Junior Citizen Scientist

May 11-May 15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Junior Citizen Scientist Badge

Junior Outdoor Challenge
Outdoor Badge Small

Junior Outdoor Challenge

May 11-15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Outdoor Challenge patch.

The Outdoor Challenge patch may be purchased in all GSCI Trefoil Boutiques. They can be reached at 888-623-1237.

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Citizen Scientist

Cadette Citizen Scientist

May 11-May 15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Cadette Citizen Scientist Badge

Cadette Outdoor Challenge
Outdoor Badge Small

Cadette Outdoor Challenge

May 11-15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Outdoor Challenge patch.

The Outdoor Challenge patch may be purchased in all GSCI Trefoil Boutiques. They can be reached at 888-623-1237.

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Citizen Scientist

Senior Citizen Scientist

May 11-May 15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Senior Citizen Scientist Badge

Senior Outdoor Challenge
Outdoor Badge Small

Senior Outdoor Challenge

May 11-15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Outdoor Challenge patch.

The Outdoor Challenge patch may be purchased in all GSCI Trefoil Boutiques. They can be reached at 888-623-1237.

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Citizen Scientist

Ambassador Citizen Scientist

May 11-May 15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Ambassador Citizen Scientist Badge

Ambassador Outdoor Challenge
Outdoor Badge Small

Ambassador Outdoor Challenge

May 11-15, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Outdoor Challenge patch.

The Outdoor Challenge patch may be purchased in all GSCI Trefoil Boutiques. They can be reached at 888-623-1237.

Week 10 May 18 - May 22

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Citizen Scientist Part 2

Daisy Citizen Scientist Part 2

May 18-May 22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Citizen Scientist badge. 

Purchase Daisy Citizen Scientist Badge

Daisy Memorial Day

Daisy Memorial Day

May 18-22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Daisy Memorial Day.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Citizen Scientist Part 2

Brownie Citizen Scientist Part 2

May 18-May 22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Brownie Citizen Scientist Badge

Brownie Memorial Day

Brownie Memorial Day

May 18-22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Brownie Memorial Day.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Citizen Scientist Part 2

Junior Citizen Scientist Part 2

May 18-May 22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Junior Citizen Scientist Badge

Junior Memorial Day

Junior Memorial Day

May 18-22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Junior Memorial Day.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Citizen Scientist Part 2

Cadette Citizen Scientist Part 2

May 18-May 22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Cadette Citizen Scientist Badge

Cadette Memorial Day

Cadette Memorial Day

May 18-22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Cadette Memorial Day.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Citizen Scientist Part 2

Senior Citizen Scientist Part 2

May 18-May 22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Senior Citizen Scientist Badge

Senior Memorial Day

Senior Memorial Day

May 18-22, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Senior Memorial Day.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Citizen Scientist Part 2
Ambassador Memorial Day

Week 11 May 25 - May 29

Daisy (Grades K-1)
Daisy Citizen Scientist Part 3

Daisy Citizen Scientist Part 3

May 25-May 29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Daisy Citizen Scientist badge. 

Purchase Daisy Citizen Scientist Badge

Daisy Wacky Weather

Daisy Wacky Weather

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Daisy Wacky Weather.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Brownie (Grades 2-3)
Brownie Citizen Scientist Part 3

Brownie Citizen Scientist Part 

May 25-May 29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Brownie Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Brownie Citizen Scientist Badge

Brownie Wacky Weather

Brownie Wacky Weather

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Brownie Wacky Weather.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Junior (Grades 4-5)
Junior Citizen Scientist Part 3

Junior Citizen Scientist Part 3

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Junior Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Junior Citizen Scientist Badge

Junior Wacky Weather

Junior Wacky Weather

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Junior Wacky Weather.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Cadette (Grades 6-8)
Cadette Citizen Scientist Part 3

Cadette Citizen Scientist Part 3

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Cadette Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Cadette Citizen Scientist Badge

Cadette Wacky Weather

Cadette Wacky Weather

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Cadette Wacky Weather.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Senior (Grades 9-10)
Senior Citizen Scientist Part 3

Senior Citizen Scientist Part 3

May25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Senior Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Senior Citizen Scientist Badge

Senior Wacky Weather

Senior Wacky Weather

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Senior Wacky Weather.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

Ambassador (Grades 11-12)
Ambassador Citizen Scientist Part 3

Ambassador Citizen Scientist Part 3

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to this Ambassador Citizen Scientist badge.

Purchase Ambassador Citizen Scientist Badge

Ambassador Wacky Weather

Ambassador Wacky Weather

May 25-29, 2020

Click here to view the presentation to all the steps to Ambassador Wacky Weather.

Click here to purchase a fun patch for this activity.

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National Service Project

Ways to Serve Your Community During the COVID-19 Pandemic

From educating communities about food production and selling Treasury Bonds during WWI and the Spanish flu pandemic to planting victory gardens and training in first aid during WWII, Girl Scouts have always stepped up in times of need, and our current COVID-19 crisis is no different. All across our country and our world, Girl Scouts have leapt to the aid of others by engaging in wonderful acts of service and kindness. Now your troop can get involved too!

Girl Scouts Give Back: Letter Writing Service Project

The idea is simple: girls write letters to people in nursing homes, senior residences, and assisted living facilities, including the dedicated staff and caregivers. This long-distance hug is a way to share your good thoughts with these vulnerable and loved community members.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Ask your girls (and their friends!) to write letters to senior and caretakers using our tips (PDF).

  2. You can  mail letters to one of the facilities (PDF) or reach out to a local assisted living center and find out how they would like to receive your troop’s letters. You could collect and deliver them (using no-contact practices), have girls mail them individually, or even deliver them via email. Don’t forget to include a note to tell the staff about the letters you’re sending (DOC).

  3. Take a picture of your letter packet and post it to your social media networks using #GirlScoutsGiveBack (and be sure to tag us @girlscoutsofcentralillinois and @girlscouts).

  4. Don't forget to come back here and log the number of letters to add them to the national campaign! Let’s see how many letters of love and care our Movement can send!

  5. If you wish to recognize your troop’s participation with a patch, we recommend this community service patch

 Check out some more detailed guidance (PDF).

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Resources from other Girl Scout Councils

While you might not be able to meet with your local Girl Scout friends during this time, you can connect with other Girl Scouts across the country! Here are more at home resources, live streams and more our sister councils are sharing:

Additional at Home Resources
Virtual Live Streaming

Girl Scouts of Central Illinois
Visit our Facebook page for a series of live streams.

Girl Scouts of Central Maryland
Visit their Facebook page for a series of live streams.

Girl Scouts of Central Texas
Visit their Facebook page for daily live streams called Trefoil TV.

Girl Scouts of the Desert Southwest
Visit their Facebook page for a series of live streams.

Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas
Visit their Facebook page for at-home activities, virtual troop options and online interactions beginning Monday, March 23.

Girl Scouts Carolina's Peaks to Piedmont
Visit their Facebook page for a series of live streams.

Girl Scouts River Valleys
Check out their Self-Care for Kids During COVID-19 information.

Girl Scouts of Southwest Texas
Visit their Facebook page for virtual troop meeting live streams.

Girl Scouts of Western Ohio
Visit their Facebook page for daily live streams for Daisies through Cadettes. Seniors and Ambassadors can view daily Instagram stories for more.

Council Patch Programs

Did you know councils can create their own patches for girls to earn? Visit our Patch Programs to find addtional activities. Then check out these programs from other councils:

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Tools and Resources

Tips for Hosting a Virtual Troop Meeting

Guidance for Virtual Troop Meetings

  • Hold a digital parent meeting before meeting with the girls to work out technology roadblocks
  • Plan well in advance with a wide variety of activities
  • Include videos that are not reliant on video or slide decks is possible
  • Engage the girls equally and by name so they are acknowledged and so they know you can see them
  • Create a group agreement with ground rules in your first meeting
  • Incorporate traditions-even if it feels awkward
  • If leader is also a parent/caregiver, encourage them to log on separately from their girl if technology allows
How to tell if stress or anxiety is overwhelming kids.
  • Behavioral Symptons - whining, irratabiliy, agitation or decrease in energy
  • Physical Symptons - headaches, rashes, sleep/appetite disturbance
  • Emotional Symptons - crying, withdrawal from peers, loss of interest, forgetfulness

How to reduce stress related to COVID-19:

  • Be informed
  • Be prepared
  • Be honest

While at home:

  • Make a schedule
  • Medi in moderation
  • Movement and meditation
  • Make time for fun and play
  • Make safe connections
  • Model healthy habits
Tools and Resources for Coping with Stress

Tips for talking to girls about COVID19, Raising Awesome Girls

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Parent/Caregiver Guide to Helping Families Cope with Coronavirus Disease, The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Advice for the Public, World Health Organization

Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation During an Infectious Disease Outbreak, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

For mental health emergencies:
Call 911 or the Disaster Distress Helpline , a national hotline for crisis counseling  ( 1-800-985-5990   or text TalkWithUs to 66746 ), The National Institute of Mental Health

7 Ways to Deal When Feeling Overwhelmed
COVID
Girl Scout Guide for Helping with COVID-19

It’s in our Girl Scout DNA to help in a time of crisis. For those that are healthy and want to help others, there are multiple ways to help those in need during the novel coronavirus outbreak. But how can we do so responsibly? In some cases, you don’t even need to step outside your home to help in a meaningful way.

This guide is a starting point for ideas you and your family can contribute to the community, whether it’s safely helping with COVID-19 outbreak efforts or taking action for community betterment.

Please be sure to stay safe and responsible while you help! Always follow all government regulations from organizations like the CDC, WHO and your county or city. Don’t forget about the  Girl Scout Safety Activity Checkpoints.

Girl Scout Guide for Helping COVOD-19

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Resources to Meet Virtually

Below is a list of free and low-cost tools troops and communities in other councils are using for virtual meetings. While we cannot endorse or support specific online meeting tools, we encourage you to look at these and alternative options and discuss with parents and girls to determine what the best solution is for your troop or community needs. 

Video and Audio Conferencing Tools

See below for a list of free and low-cost tools that could be useful to you. We encourage troop leaders to look at these and alternative options and discuss with parents and girls to determine what the best solution is for your troop’s needs. 

While all of these options have a free version, please note you may be prompted to consider their upgraded versions for a subscription fee.

  • Zoom - FAQ
    • Note: Meetings durations maximum of 40 minutes in free version
  • Skype - Support
    • Note: Up to 10 participants free
  • Webex – Help Center
    • Note: Limited file and content sharing in free version

Please Note About Zoom Conferencing: March 30, 2020

FBI Warns of Teleconferencing and Online Classroom Hijacking
During COVID-19 Pandemic – ZOOM 

As we turn to video-teleconferencing platforms to stay connected in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis, reports of hijacking (also called “Zoom-bombing”) are emerging nationwide. The FBI has received multiple reports of conferences being disrupted by pornographic and/or hate images and threatening language.

As we continue the transition to online lessons and meetings, the FBI recommends exercising due diligence and caution in your cybersecurity efforts.

The following steps can be taken to mitigate teleconference hijacking threats:

  • Do not make meetings or classrooms public. In Zoom, there are two options to make a meeting private: require a meeting password or use the waiting room feature and control the admittance of guests.
  • Do not share a link to a teleconference or classroom on an unrestricted publicly available social media post. Provide the link directly to specific people.
  • Manage screensharing options. In Zoom, change screensharing to “Host Only.”
  • Ensure users are using the updated version of remote access/meeting applications. In January 2020, Zoom updated their software. In their security update, the teleconference software provider added passwords by default for meetings and disabled the ability to randomly scan for meetings to join.
  • Lastly, ensure that your organization’s telework policy or guide addresses requirements for physical and information security.
Chat and Collaboration Tools

While all of these options have a free version, please note you may be prompted to consider their upgraded versions for a subscription fee.

Additional Low Cost Tools

Additional low-cost tools for collaboration and conferencing to consider if the above options do not meet your group's needs.

Click here to find our latest council updates about COVID-19.